Prompt of the Week: One Sentence Wonder

Write a story or poem in one sentence.


Write your response in the comments below. Your entry may get a shout out next week!

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

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What Inspired My Short Stories (Part Two)

Hey Writer Bees!

So, this week, I tested positive for Covid. I’ve had a bad fever and chills and non-stop coughing. Not a fun time, I assure you. This is my first go-around testing positive with Covid. Don’t worry, I’ve been resting and working from home the past few days. And I’m looking forward to a three-day weekend staycation.

You guys loved my last story inspiration post, I decided to do a part two while I’m quarantining. Enjoy!

Remember The Crazy Times of 2020?

How fitting is it that I start off with this story, huh? While surrounded by blankets and used tissues? Right at the start of 2021, I wrote this 100-word story. We were all in the middle of the pandemic. I wanted to remember this crazy time and captured that in a short story. Because really, years from now, how will quarantine and covid be remembered? How will we talk about this moment in time? That idea inspired this piece. Also, it was an effort to spread some hope through humor. Even in the midst of a global pandemic, there will be light at the end of the tunnel.

Sunny Day Towing Company

Let’s keep the positivity train rolling, shall we? Frankly, this short was inspired by a bad day. I had a stressful and overwhelming couple of days, was in a bad headspace. My mental health was struggling. But the magical thing about creativity is that it can be used as an outlet. Using this blog as a safe space, I channeled all my sadness into writing a short story. I imagined my worries being towed away. And honestly, my heart felt a little lighter after writing this story. Lesson learned, sometimes, you have to write with heart and write what you are feeling. No shame in that game.

A Victim at Midnight

Before I wrote this story, I wrote 5 Subgenres of Horror Fiction Explained. One of the subgenres I talked about was psychological horror. While horror isn’t my favorite, I do enjoy a good ghost story. Taking inspiration from the psychological horror subgenre and my love of all things haunted and mystery, I wrote this story. Plus, I was able to mix in detective fiction elements too. Super happy with how this piece turned out. To challenge myself, I try writing in genres I don’t usually write in. It’s a great writing exercise, I highly recommend exploring other genres.


Is there a story behind your stories? What has inspired your creative endeavors? Talk to me in the comments.

Write with heart.

Love,

Lady Jabberwocky

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The Basil Sprites (100 Word Fantasy Story)(Repost)

Hello Writer Bees! Sorry for the late post this week. Work has been hectic! But I didn’t want to leave you empty handed. Since I’m in a fantasy genre mood lately, I’m reposting this short fairytale. Now that I think of it, this may have been the first 100-word story I’ve ever written. From two years ago! Hope you all enjoy. Write with heart! – Love, Victoria aka Lady Jabberwocky.


Hidden under basil leaves, they sit, aglow. With their firefly kisses and rice paper wings, they wait for the first sprig of spring to sprout. Wandering travelers fondly call them diminutive deities. In unwavering tradition, farmers tie bells or chimes to branches, to win favor with these guardians of the field.

Threads of golden luck tucked in their clutches, the little spirits bless the harvest of many. Be weary, dear friends. Do not ravage the earth nor mistreat nature itself. Common basil sprites will become vengeful imps, inviting weeds and death onto your land. Best to keep the bells ringing.


Stay safe and keep writing.

— Lady Jabberwocky

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The Golden Rule of Fiction Writing: Show, Don’t Tell

Hello Writer Bees,

This week, we’re talking about the fundamental golden rule of fiction writing. A technique most writers know as Show, don’t tell. But what is show, don’t tell? How do you use this writing technique? Will it help take your stories to the next level? Let’s explore that, shall we?

What is Show Don’t Tell?

In simple terms, Show Don’t Tell is a writing technique where the writer leaves behind lengthy expositions and explanations. Instead, the plot, it’s tone and characterization are all conveyed through actions, thoughts, and feelings. Showing the audience instead of telling them point blank. At its heart, Show, Don’t Tell is about how readers experience a story. How they learn information and how they draw their own conclusions.

And many famous authors have used this technique in their creative works too. There’s this quote by Russian playwright Anton Chekhov that is often associated with the Show Don’t Tell technique. “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” Also, Ernest Hemingway shared similar views on storytelling in his notable iceberg theory.

Tips on Using the Show Don’t Tell Rule

  • Set up the Setting: When describing the setting, play with the reader’s senses. Remember, it’s not just about the visuals. Think about how sight, smell, sound, touch and taste tie into a scene. What noises can be heard from the background? What does the texture of a blanket feel like? What are the flavors of a home-cooked meal? No need to go overboard with details but give the audience enough to feel immersed in the world.
  • Digging the Dialogue: How characters communicate with one another can be a telling sign of their relationship. Think about it, you’d speak to a family member differently than a coworker, right? Plus, dialogue is an excellent tool for showing a character’s nature and personality. Someone with an excitable personality is going to have more lively conversation while a shy person may mumble or stutter a bit.
  • Understanding Emotions: When in doubt, pull that flowery language out of your writer sleeves. Every writer has that in their arsenal. Metaphors, similes, and personification can help express emotions and moods in any story. Like “the chill of fear tumbling down your spine“. That sort of wordy goodness. Keep in mind, this poetic style of writing may not suit your specific narrator. For example, my WIP’s narrator, Oscar Fitzgerald, is fast talking and not exactly a poetic soul.

Examples of Show Don’t Tell.

TELLINGSHOWING
She was tired.Dragging her feet, she yawned and stretched out her arms.
The room was filthy.Dirty laundry strewn across the floor. Stains on the paint chipped walls. A rotten smell in the air.
He was a shy guy.Staring at his shoes, his stood on the sidelines of the party. With a soft voice, a blush painted his face as he tried to start a conversation.

Final Thoughts

Does each sentence you write need to follow this rule? Probably not. Exposition can come in handy, if used correctly. Find the balance between showing enough and telling enough. Will the Show Don’t Tell technique improve the quality of your stories? In my opinion? Yeah. By showing rather than telling, the whole story gains a new level of depth and complexity, and it allows readers to fully engage with the plot, characters and overall tone.


What are your thoughts on Show Don’t Tell ? Do you apply this technique to your writing? Talk to me in the comments. As always, I love to hear from you.

Have a question about creative writing or blog writing? Let me know! It may be answered in a post in the near future.

Write with heart.

Love,

Lady Jabberwocky

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Celebrating 500 Blog Posts!

Hello Writer Bees!

I’m back from vacation! My partner and I had such a fun trip. We left feeling relaxed, recharged and genuinely happy. And we mostly drank beer and ate fried food the entire weekend. So good times all around.

Something exciting happened since my last entry. The Lady Jabberwocky blog reached 500 posts!

That’s mindboggling to me. When I first started this blog, I wasn’t sure if I could consistently create content and handle the responsibility of a platform. I wasn’t even sure if anyone cared what I had to say. Now look, all this hard work paid off and has amounted to 500 posts. And I’m ready for 500 more.

A lesson for all the new bloggers, don’t give up. At first, It may seem like a daunting task, constantly coming up with ideas for your audience. If making content and blogging is what you love, keep going. Your readers will find you. For those who are considering blogging, or are just starting out, check out some of my helpful posts below.

Also, I believe my blog anniversary is coming up in a few weeks. It’ll be five years since I started blogging. How should we celebrate my blogaversary? Leave ideas in the comments.

Thanks for sticking around on my writing journey. You guys are the reason I write.


Take care of yourselves and each other.

Write with heart.

Love,

Victoria (aka Lady Jabberwocky)

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Out Of Office: This Lady is on Vacation!

Hello Writer Bees,

When this post is posted, my partner and I will be driving to upstate New York for a well needed weekend away. With work and life being hectic right now, both of us were overdue for a break, to recharge and to mind our mental health.

But I didn’t want to leave you guys empty handed this week. Blogger’s guilt is a real thing, you know. So below I’ve shared links to some of my previous posts. Check them out!

Writing Tips

15 Ways to Beat Writer’s Block

Pen Name VS. Real Name: The Great Writer Debate

How to Build Up Suspense in Any Genre

About This Lady Writer

The Inspiration Behind Naming my Blog

Do You Need a Writing Degree to Be a Real Writer?

The 3 Ways I Beat Blogger’s Block

100 Word Stories

Sunny Day Towing Company (100 Word Self Care Story)

The Basil Sprites (100 Word Fantasy Story)

Hamburgers and Horoscopes (100 Word Humor Story)


What do you want to see next on the blog? Do you have any questions about fiction writing, blogging or my writer journey? Let me know in the comments. As always, I love to hear from you.

Take care of yourselves and each other.

Write with heart.

Love,

Lady Jabberwocky

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