How to Pitch Articles Like a Pro

Hello writer bees!

With the start of a new year, it’s time to take charge of your freelancing endeavors. How can you achieve the perfect pitch? And no, I don’t mean musically. A pitch, by definition means “words used when trying to persuade someone to buy or accept something.” Sometimes, freelancers must sell their ideas for articles to potential buyers. It’s all about that hustle.

So, let’s talk about creating an eye catching pitch. This could be for a publication you regularly write for, or, if you are gutsy, a website that you’ve never interacted with before.

Research Beforehand

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So important. Know what this potential buyer is looking for. Get a feel for their tone and their content. What kind of topics do they post about? Is the tone formal or informal? Do they include pictures and jokes? Understand their readership as well. Who is their target audience? What message do they wish to present to the world.

Here’s a pro tip; Make sure you read articles from the publication. And yes, I mean it. Actually read, don’t fib about being a “big fan” of their site. Come on, we’ve all done that.

Also, make sure you go over their submission guidelines. Just about every online publication has a guidelines page, some even show their pay per article upfront. And some editors have specific rules that they want followed, like a certain style or word count. Try to make the editor’s job easier and cover all the bases.

Know What Every Great Pitch Needs

Next, let’s break down all the essentials needed for one amazing pitch. Here’s the recipe for greatness.

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  1. What type of material?: Article? Listicle? Essay? Interview? Editors like to know the format you, as the writer, is aiming for.
  2. Potential Title: Don’t just say the topic is about “tacos”. Instead, try possible, attention grabbing headlines like “Crunchy vs Soft Shells; Which are Superior?” or “Veggie Add-ins for Taco Night.” Be aware, titles sometimes change during the editing process, don’t sweat too much!
  3. Impact: Talk about why readers would be interested in what you have to say. Give them a compelling reason why your piece fits their publication. If you know specific viewership numbers, provide a guesstimate of how many readers might read your article.
  4. Stance: If it’s an argumentative piece, discuss your perspective on the subject. Be careful of being too controversial. Always stay fact based in your opinion and cite sources when needed.

Short and Sweet

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Imagine you’re in an elevator and only have a couple sentences to convey your idea. Because a great pitch only needs a few sentences to hook someone’s attention. Keep your pitch brief. Be clear and be focused. At the end of a day, a proper pitch should only be a couple hundred words, (~200-300 words).

And consider including your portfolio or publication history and a brief introduction of yourself. Don’t go overboard, we’re keeping things short, remember? But still, try to sell yourself and your talents quickly yet effectively.


Fortune favors the brave, so be brave when pitching article ideas. Best of luck with your pitches, writer bees!

To all the freelancers out there, how do you hustle in your work? What’s your advice on sending the perfect pitch?

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

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The Most Oddball Article Topics I've Ever Written About

Hello hello writer bugs!

You know, this holiday season is driving me crazy. After nearly getting trampled at the mall and doing some serious Christmas shopping, I want to relax in festive pajamas.

For this week, let’s keep things lighthearted and fun, shall we? A while ago, I talked about how important it is to be versatile as a freelancer writer. In this line of work, you never know what you’ll get. Clients can ask for anything. Assignments can be sometimes strange, in a good way.

Here are some humorous examples of topics I’ve had to write for clients, to bring you some holiday joy and laughter. Hope you enjoy!

Fun Facts About Peter Pan

Wow. Way back in the days of an internship, I was charged with writing about all things Disney. And I loved it. Sometimes, I’d write a list of “fun facts” about iconic Disney characters or movies. Like Fun Facts about Peter Pan. (Also Fun facts about Minnie Mouse, Fun facts about the Little Mermaid, etc.) Although I’m still not sure who’d be interested in articles like that, except for trivia buffs, I researched a ton to dig up some interesting facts. Did you know that Walt Disney played Peter Pan in a school play? Yeah, neither did I.

Nightwing Meets Magilla Gorrilla

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When I used to write comic book reviews for a certain website, each week would be a new issue to critique. Series like Nightwing, Birds of Prey, Hawkman and the Silencer, for all the comic nerds. About once a year, DC Comics partners with Hanna-Barbera in fun crossover episodes. Guess what I was assigned? Nightwing meets Magilla Gorrilla. A classic, really. You don’t want to know how many monkey puns were used in the writing of that review. It’s not that it was a bad comic (the two team up to solve a mystery together), it’s that I never thought I’d see my favorite hero paired up with a gorilla in a campy special. Nor did I imagine I’d have to write about it.

Baby Shark

This one takes the cake for the strangest topic I’ve ever had to write about, hands down. Yes, I wrote an article on viral sensation Baby Shark. 1000 words to be exact. It was for some random guy who claimed to have a music website and wanted to “keep up with the trends”.

For the record, I never watched the video up until this point, because I’m not a toddler. Let me tell you how thorough this piece was. I researched the origins of baby shark, explained the video in painfully vivid detail, and discussed it’s impact and legacy in pop culture. And I had that ‘baby shark doo-doo-doo-doo-doo’ song stuck in my head.

Moral of the Story

Expect the unexpected. A job is a job, no matter how odd. Us freelancers have to stay flexible, even if the topic comes out of left field. And believe or not, looking back on those articles still brings a smile to my face. So If someone asks you to write an article on the history of chocolate chip cookies, you should just shrug and say “Sure, why not? Whatever floats your boat.”

For my fellow freelancers out there, what are some strange orders you’ve been asked for? Talk to me in the comments.

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

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Need a Writer? Then I'm Your Lady! Hire This Writer!

Hello! I’m Victoria and I’ve been a freelance writer for 2 years. Over the course of my freelancing adventures, I’ve written everything from product descriptions to full length articles.

If interested in hiring my services, feel free to email me anytime at VickiP2593@gmail.com .

(Payment through PayPal) (Writing Samples are Available)

Blog Post and Article Writing

Any topic. Research included. Free revisions, if needed. Writing samples are available.

Favored topics: Food and Beverage. Travel. Pets. Creative Writing. Comic Books. Art. Animation.

Tone: Lighthearted. Conversational. Humorous. Engaging.

  • 500 words = $15
  • 1000 words = $20 – $30
  • 2000 words = $40 – $50
  • 5000 words = $100 – $120

Word count is flexible and prices are negotiable.

Product Descriptions

Got products that need describing? Whether they are short, catchy tidbits or in depth details, I can write product descriptions that perfectly showcase your inventory. Let me know how many items and your desired length of descriptions.

Price: ~$20 per 1000 words

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Prices may vary, depending on word count and how much editing needs to be done. This can be a quick cleanup or major corrections and notes for improvement. I will have your essay looking like an A plus in no time!

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(Note: I have the right to decline orders for whatever reason.)

NaNoWriMo 2019 – The Goal, The Plan, The Anxiety

Hello, hello, writer bees.

NaNoWriMo is right around the corner. And although I’m a bit nervous, I accept this intimidating challenge. I wanted to share with you guys my hopes and my game plan for National Novel Writing Month.

The Goal

Okay. My goal isn’t the traditional 50k in November. Currently, my draft is hovering around 20,000 words. And it’s looking pretty rough. It’s a rough rough draft. So for NaNoWriMo 2019, my word count goal is 40,000 words, making for a total of 60,000 words.

Frankly, my real goal is to write more often. Daily, if possible. Even if it’s just small increments everyday. Unfortunately, my WIP has been simmering on the back burner for too long. I want my humble little draft to take one step closer to becoming a full fledged manuscript. That’s how I want to finish NaNoWriMo this year.

Planning and Prepping

So, considering my goal, I figure that averages about 10,000 words a week. That’s possible, right? The skeleton of the story is there, scenes just need to be bumped up or added. I’m working on an outline as I write this post, but am open to new ideas that come along during the writing process. I guess that makes me a plantser? Half planning, half “winging it”. Hopefully, I can scrape something together before November starts.

Part of my prepping involves looking back at my previous NaNoWriMo experience. Learning from past mistakes. Taking my own advice. I acknowledge my weak points as a writer and I’m trying to push through them. Like writing without editing or deleting scares me. That’s one obstacle I’ve struggled to jump over.

Right now, I’m stressing a bit and waiting for the NaNoWriMo excitement to fully kick in. Imagine that nervous feeling before jumping off the high diving board. That’s how I’m feeling at the moment. What if I run out of ideas and my writing fizzles out? And maybe it’s just me, but it seems like everyone else is having fun prepping with their neat, organized outlines and I’m over here with my ugly baby of a draft. Seriously? However, I’m working on staying optimistic. Perhaps we can polish up this draft, it’s worth a shot.

What’s Happening on Lady Jabberwocky?

Glad you asked! During this November, I will be posting weekly updates on Fridays/Saturdays. That way, you all can follow my NaNoWriMo adventure. I really do want to put in the effort this year. So, I hope you guys come along for the NaNoWriMo ride with me.

Thank you guys for your support and lovely comments. Best of luck to all those participating in National Novel Writing Month.

Lady Jabberwocky

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How to Handle Rewrites Like a Freelance Writer

Since October is the season of facing monsters, let’s talk about what most freelance writers fear and dread during every project; Revisions, rewrites and criticism. Dun dun dunnnn.

Have no fear, rewrites aren’t so scary. And they’ll happen more often than you think.

Setting the Scene

You are a freelance writer, working your hustle. Whatever material your buyer needs written, you put a considerable amount of effort into it. Once completed, you are proud of your finished piece and send it off for review. You’re left crossing your fingers that whatever you wrote is exactly what they ordered, no edits needed. Then, said buyer returns your work to you with notes. ‘Trim this, rewrite this section, change that, add more, fix this.’ Now, you are charged with perfecting your writing. And that may be a daunting task for some.

Has this happened to me? Oh yes, plenty of times. At first, corrections would hit me right in my ego and self confidence. Like “Maybe I’m an awful writer. My writing is garbage. I’m the worst.” Today, I just take it as a challenge. It’s a way for me to become a better writer. Actually, the other day, a repeat buyer sent me back an article with many crossed out sentences, to be deleted or rewritten. While yes, it stings a tiny bit, I cracked my neck and dove right back in to another round of writing, reassuring the customer that I could handle rewrites, no problem.

How to Tackle Revisions

When you are a writer, you have to expect, and be open to, criticism. I’ve seen so many writers get offended by constructive criticism. Don’t take it personally. Revisions are part of the writing process, especially in freelancing. At the end of the day, you are trying to fulfill someone else’s request. Therefore, you must collaborate with another person to achieve a goal, an awesome piece of writing.

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Often times, a client will give you their notes, aspects of your work they want to change. Those comments get turned into your to do list. Once you’ve received edits, go back to the original piece and pinpoint all the errors they mention. Remember, this is the second time you’ll be looking at what you wrote, so it will be with fresh eyes. Make adjustments at the buyer’s request, whether you agree or not. The customer’s always right, right? Once the piece is ready for review again, double check that checklist. Be sure you hit all the points noted and deliver exactly what the client wants.

And keep in mind, there can be multiple rounds of edits. Communication with your client is key.

Living Up to Expectations

It depends on who you’re working for, whether it be a one time buyer or a regular customer. Their expectations might be strict and precise, or might be laid back and they’ll accept anything. The more you interact with them, the more you’ll understand their standards. Trust me, I’ve received everything from minor editorial notes to a long laundry list of notes. It happens. The ‘under revisions’ stage is just one step in the writing process for freelancers.

Clients may offer some detailed instructions, or they may give you a vague topic to run with. Really understand what the buyer is looking for. And if you are feeling unsure about something, or confused about directions, asking a bunch of questions help. In my experience, it’s better to bother them with questions, just to be certain of what they want, as opposed to taking their request at face value and shooting in the dark.

Home Runs

In my experience as a freelance writer, nothing beats handing in work that is error free. When the client says “This is perfect! This is exactly what I was looking for!” It happens rarely, but when it does, I call it a home run, knocked right out of the park. I do a little happy dance in my seat. Savor those moments of sweet victory.

Offering your work up for review can be intimidating. And waiting for possible corrections while an article is up for criticism can be a bit nerve-wracking. I cross my fingers every time I send anything out. But, rewrites happen more often than not. And that’s okay. It’s not necessarily something you’ve done wrong, or not well enough. So, don’t feel discouraged when a paragraph needs rewriting. Remember your skills as a writer and revisions won’t be so scary.

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I want to hear from you guys. How do you feel when given criticism on your work? How do you handle the revision process? Be honest, and let me know in the comments.

Lady Jabberwocky

Third Times the Charm? – Signing Up for NaNoWriMo Again

Hello writer bees!

Time flies so quickly and it’s already October! And I’ve only just started to think about NaNoWriMo. Geez, I’m behind. Honestly, I wasn’t sure If I should, or even could, participate in NaNoWriMo this year. The last two tries ended in “failure“.

Frankly speaking, I’ve been distant with my WIP as of late. Life and freelancing get so busy and drafts get put on the back burner. I want to change that.

I have to get back in touch with my characters. I want fall in love with the setting again. I want to add more to the story and create something special. That’s my plan for October and NaNoWriMo.

I don’t know what my word count goal for the month of November will be yet. Maybe 30,000? Maybe the big 50,000? The basic skeleton of a plot is mostly done, hovering at around 20,000 words. Perhaps my goal should just be to write everyday, even if it’s a small amount.

Sounds like I’m just convincing myself to commit to NaNoWriMo this year. My boyfriend said “What’s the worse that could happen? You write words?” Thank you, handsome voice of reason. And who knows? Maybe third times the charm.

What do you guys think? What should my word count goal be? How are you guys planning for NaNoWriMo? Would you be interested in my weekly updates during November? Tell me everything in the comments. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

– Lady Jabberwocky

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What Materials I’ve Written and How to Stay Versatile

Hello, writer bugs!

A couple of weeks ago, the flash flood typist suggested I write a post about what kind of materials I’ve written. 

So, today I’ll be going over everything I’ve ever had to write for clients. And after, I’ll tell you how you too can be versatile in freelance business. By no means am I bragging out this one of a kind job. I just never realized how eclectic my work experience would become. 

As a freelance writer, I’ve been tasked with writing a variety of different materials. Most of the time, I’m either producing content that is informative or that sells a product/service. Frankly, you never know what you’ll get in freelancing.

Food and Travel Blog Posts

Side note: For food I had never eaten and places I had never traveled to.

When I first started out as a writer working from home, my first gig was an unpaid internship at a travel blog. Titles mostly began with “Everything you need to know about…..” or “The best…”. Since I wasn’t heading to Disneyland anytime soon, posts involved a lot of research and cross referencing other sources. Even relying on the commentary of park goers. What delicious dishes were they raving about? I loved writing about the food scene at the Disney parks. 

For the rides, I’d look into the history of the ride itself. What makes the ride special? What actually riding the ride was like? Sometimes, I’d look up grainy videos of sneaky park goers filming the rides. 

Product Descriptions 

Yeah, I’ve written product descriptions for two vastly different companies. One was for a hardware supply company. And I know nothing about tools. Frankly, It all looked the same to me. I had to really focus on what the tools were made of and what their function was. 

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The second time I wrote product descriptions was for an ice cream business. And between you and me, I’m highly allergic to dairy and never had ice cream. So there’s that. As a writer, I simply put the spotlight on the texture and the flavor of their sweet creations. Using specific details and adjectives paints an appealing image for a potential buyer. 

Photography Packages

Recently, I’ve been working on packages for a photography site. I’ve picked up an upbeat, catchy voice, similar to a used car salesman. I’m charged with selling a “product”. My words need to convince someone to consider purchasing a professional photography session. And with only 150 words, the result is bite sized pieces presented like an elevator pitch. Short, sweet and to the point.  

Comic Reviews (~700 words) 

For over a year, I wrote weekly comic book reviews for a nerdy website. Reading comics isn’t all fun and games. Following the site’s strict criteria and a rating system, I judged the art styles and the plot lines of some DC Comics publications. Also, I was exposed to other genres I never thought to read. And I liked expressing my dorky side through writing. 

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There’s a bit of pressure offering my opinion on published works and collaborating with editors. Like, who am I to say what’s a great issue and what’s a bad issue? I’m just a lady freelance writer. However, I did learn about the backend workings of composing an article. Tags, links, images, all those bells and whistles behind blog posts.  

Articles about Anything (~1,000 to 2,000 words)

Lots of different topics. Everything from Vegan snacks to Baby Shark. (Yes, the viral video baby shark).  I mean, I could have a post about the oddball articles I’ve written alone. I probably will eventually. When I was on Fiverr, I would just receive random orders from random people. Like party mix. Starting out as a freelance writer will seem like that at first. And hello, writer bees. Of course, I write articles here on Lady Jabberwocky for you lovely folks. 

Be Versatile and Flexible

With the freelance writer job, you are providing a service. Paying customers are coming up to you with their orders. Here’s the thing about freelancing; Some potential clients may ask for something “off the menu”, something you aren’t openly offering on your platform. You might miss out on an opportunity if you only write one type of written material.  

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Bear in mind, the more you offer, the larger the workload. Take that as you will. More money or more stress? (Not that I’m rolling in cash anyway). That being said, you’re allowed to turn down prospects that just aren’t up your alley. However, be open and flexible to other forms of content, any new experience can be rewarding. 

You want to reassure clients that you can handle anything they throw at you. 


What else do you guys want to know about being a freelance writer. For my fellow freelancers, what materials do you like (or dislike) writing? How do you stay flexible in your work? Also, I’m coming up on 200 followers. What should I do to celebrate? Let me know in the comments! I’d love to hear from you!

– Lady Jabberwocky

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