How to Handle Rewrites Like a Freelance Writer

Since October is the season of facing monsters, let’s talk about what most freelance writers fear and dread during every project; Revisions, rewrites and criticism. Dun dun dunnnn.

Have no fear, rewrites aren’t so scary. And they’ll happen more often than you think.

Setting the Scene

You are a freelance writer, working your hustle. Whatever material your buyer needs written, you put a considerable amount of effort into it. Once completed, you are proud of your finished piece and send it off for review. You’re left crossing your fingers that whatever you wrote is exactly what they ordered, no edits needed. Then, said buyer returns your work to you with notes. ‘Trim this, rewrite this section, change that, add more, fix this.’ Now, you are charged with perfecting your writing. And that may be a daunting task for some.

Has this happened to me? Oh yes, plenty of times. At first, corrections would hit me right in my ego and self confidence. Like “Maybe I’m an awful writer. My writing is garbage. I’m the worst.” Today, I just take it as a challenge. It’s a way for me to become a better writer. Actually, the other day, a repeat buyer sent me back an article with many crossed out sentences, to be deleted or rewritten. While yes, it stings a tiny bit, I cracked my neck and dove right back in to another round of writing, reassuring the customer that I could handle rewrites, no problem.

How to Tackle Revisions

When you are a writer, you have to expect, and be open to, criticism. I’ve seen so many writers get offended by constructive criticism. Don’t take it personally. Revisions are part of the writing process, especially in freelancing. At the end of the day, you are trying to fulfill someone else’s request. Therefore, you must collaborate with another person to achieve a goal, an awesome piece of writing.

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Often times, a client will give you their notes, aspects of your work they want to change. Those comments get turned into your to do list. Once you’ve received edits, go back to the original piece and pinpoint all the errors they mention. Remember, this is the second time you’ll be looking at what you wrote, so it will be with fresh eyes. Make adjustments at the buyer’s request, whether you agree or not. The customer’s always right, right? Once the piece is ready for review again, double check that checklist. Be sure you hit all the points noted and deliver exactly what the client wants.

And keep in mind, there can be multiple rounds of edits. Communication with your client is key.

Living Up to Expectations

It depends on who you’re working for, whether it be a one time buyer or a regular customer. Their expectations might be strict and precise, or might be laid back and they’ll accept anything. The more you interact with them, the more you’ll understand their standards. Trust me, I’ve received everything from minor editorial notes to a long laundry list of notes. It happens. The ‘under revisions’ stage is just one step in the writing process for freelancers.

Clients may offer some detailed instructions, or they may give you a vague topic to run with. Really understand what the buyer is looking for. And if you are feeling unsure about something, or confused about directions, asking a bunch of questions help. In my experience, it’s better to bother them with questions, just to be certain of what they want, as opposed to taking their request at face value and shooting in the dark.

Home Runs

In my experience as a freelance writer, nothing beats handing in work that is error free. When the client says “This is perfect! This is exactly what I was looking for!” It happens rarely, but when it does, I call it a home run, knocked right out of the park. I do a little happy dance in my seat. Savor those moments of sweet victory.

Offering your work up for review can be intimidating. And waiting for possible corrections while an article is up for criticism can be a bit nerve-wracking. I cross my fingers every time I send anything out. But, rewrites happen more often than not. And that’s okay. It’s not necessarily something you’ve done wrong, or not well enough. So, don’t feel discouraged when a paragraph needs rewriting. Remember your skills as a writer and revisions won’t be so scary.

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I want to hear from you guys. How do you feel when given criticism on your work? How do you handle the revision process? Be honest, and let me know in the comments.

Lady Jabberwocky

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What Materials I’ve Written and How to Stay Versatile

Hello, writer bugs!

A couple of weeks ago, the flash flood typist suggested I write a post about what kind of materials I’ve written. 

So, today I’ll be going over everything I’ve ever had to write for clients. And after, I’ll tell you how you too can be versatile in freelance business. By no means am I bragging out this one of a kind job. I just never realized how eclectic my work experience would become. 

As a freelance writer, I’ve been tasked with writing a variety of different materials. Most of the time, I’m either producing content that is informative or that sells a product/service. Frankly, you never know what you’ll get in freelancing.

Food and Travel Blog Posts

Side note: For food I had never eaten and places I had never traveled to.

When I first started out as a writer working from home, my first gig was an unpaid internship at a travel blog. Titles mostly began with “Everything you need to know about…..” or “The best…”. Since I wasn’t heading to Disneyland anytime soon, posts involved a lot of research and cross referencing other sources. Even relying on the commentary of park goers. What delicious dishes were they raving about? I loved writing about the food scene at the Disney parks. 

For the rides, I’d look into the history of the ride itself. What makes the ride special? What actually riding the ride was like? Sometimes, I’d look up grainy videos of sneaky park goers filming the rides. 

Product Descriptions 

Yeah, I’ve written product descriptions for two vastly different companies. One was for a hardware supply company. And I know nothing about tools. Frankly, It all looked the same to me. I had to really focus on what the tools were made of and what their function was. 

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The second time I wrote product descriptions was for an ice cream business. And between you and me, I’m highly allergic to dairy and never had ice cream. So there’s that. As a writer, I simply put the spotlight on the texture and the flavor of their sweet creations. Using specific details and adjectives paints an appealing image for a potential buyer. 

Photography Packages

Recently, I’ve been working on packages for a photography site. I’ve picked up an upbeat, catchy voice, similar to a used car salesman. I’m charged with selling a “product”. My words need to convince someone to consider purchasing a professional photography session. And with only 150 words, the result is bite sized pieces presented like an elevator pitch. Short, sweet and to the point.  

Comic Reviews (~700 words) 

For over a year, I wrote weekly comic book reviews for a nerdy website. Reading comics isn’t all fun and games. Following the site’s strict criteria and a rating system, I judged the art styles and the plot lines of some DC Comics publications. Also, I was exposed to other genres I never thought to read. And I liked expressing my dorky side through writing. 

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There’s a bit of pressure offering my opinion on published works and collaborating with editors. Like, who am I to say what’s a great issue and what’s a bad issue? I’m just a lady freelance writer. However, I did learn about the backend workings of composing an article. Tags, links, images, all those bells and whistles behind blog posts.  

Articles about Anything (~1,000 to 2,000 words)

Lots of different topics. Everything from Vegan snacks to Baby Shark. (Yes, the viral video baby shark).  I mean, I could have a post about the oddball articles I’ve written alone. I probably will eventually. When I was on Fiverr, I would just receive random orders from random people. Like party mix. Starting out as a freelance writer will seem like that at first. And hello, writer bees. Of course, I write articles here on Lady Jabberwocky for you lovely folks. 

Be Versatile and Flexible

With the freelance writer job, you are providing a service. Paying customers are coming up to you with their orders. Here’s the thing about freelancing; Some potential clients may ask for something “off the menu”, something you aren’t openly offering on your platform. You might miss out on an opportunity if you only write one type of written material.  

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Bear in mind, the more you offer, the larger the workload. Take that as you will. More money or more stress? (Not that I’m rolling in cash anyway). That being said, you’re allowed to turn down prospects that just aren’t up your alley. However, be open and flexible to other forms of content, any new experience can be rewarding. 

You want to reassure clients that you can handle anything they throw at you. 


What else do you guys want to know about being a freelance writer. For my fellow freelancers, what materials do you like (or dislike) writing? How do you stay flexible in your work? Also, I’m coming up on 200 followers. What should I do to celebrate? Let me know in the comments! I’d love to hear from you!

– Lady Jabberwocky

Become a Patron!

What’s Next for the Lady Jabberwocky Blog? (Announcements)

I’m back, writer bugs!

Thanks for your patience and support during my break.

I really needed time to brainstorm ideas and make (evil) plans for this site. I think you guys will be pretty happy with what is to come. As terrifying as it sounds, I’m trying to take blogging more seriously and make my own opportunities.

Very quickly, let me go over what’s next for Lady Jabberwocky.

First off, I have officially upgraded this blog to premium level. Keep your eyes open for changes on the site. Some pages may be under construction, so bear with me. Best case scenario, I can organize all my posts in an easy to access way. If anyone has advice on rearranging posts into sections/categories, please leave instructions in the comments. I’m a lowly writer trying to figure this stuff out, but it is a challenge I accept nonetheless.

Now, in regards to content itself. I’m opting to post twice a week, Mondays and Fridays. Unfortunately, I’m taking a break from Words for Writers Wednesdays. But you can still find them on the blog, in case you need a bit of encouragement.

More posts about freelance writing are coming. I’m surprised so many of you seem interested in my insane occupation. Also, more stories are coming. And who knows? Maybe even a fiction series, just for you guys! Plus, I’ll still be sharing writing advice for all you budding authors out there.

Nothing is set in stone yet, I’m still ironing out the details. Although there are finishing touches to be finished, I am truly excited (and so nervous) for the changes coming to my humble little blog.

Posts will resume this Monday, September 23rd.

How can you support a writer and her blog? Become a Patron! You support means to world to me. Thanks everybody!

The Top Three Cons of Freelance Writing

Hey pidgeons!

Wow, you guys seemed to really like the first post from ‘Notes of a Lady Freelance Writer’. Duly noted, writer bees. Since last week I talked about the pros of freelancing, let’s talk about some of the cons that come with the job.

Side note: This is solely based on my experience as a Freelance Writer. Freelancing is different for everyone.


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Work Ethic and Distractions

Let’s face it, schedules are unpredictable and life is full of distractions, especially if you’re working from home. Family, kids, other jobs, chores, the list goes on and on. Battling procrastination everyday is a real thing. The responsibility of managing projects is entirely on you. You need to have strong work ethic and motivation to be a freelance writer.

With the freedom to work whenever comes working at odd hours. For me, I’ve caught myself writing around midnight. This may be because I’m a night writer and usually get more work done when the rest of New York is asleep. Even though I’m an easily distracted procrastinator, I still meet every deadline. (I’m actually binge watching Cardcaptors as I’m writing this. Multitasking or distracting? You tell me.)

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Broke and Lonely

In my experience, it took a while to gain momentum and build a presence online. At the start, you might get underpaid for work, which is discouraging. And sometimes, it’ll feel like you’re putting in more work than your being paid for. Don’t expect to make the big bucks right off the bat, the chump change comes first.

Since you are working by yourself, except for the occasional email, you may feel a bit detached from the world. Personally, I miss those face to face interactions with people. If I’m completely honest, it’s lonely as a freelance writer. I don’t have the luxury of collaborating with coworkers in person, like someone else would in an office environment.

Side note: I know a lot of freelancers have had trouble with receiving payments from buyers. For the most part, I haven’t had trouble with that, with any client I’ve worked with (knock on wood). Be sure to keep open communication with whoever you’re working with.

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The Uncertainty

There’s a lot of uncertainty with freelancing. Job security is difficult to find. Your monthly salary is up in the air. And benefits, like medical coverage, is incredibly rare. Some days, you might have a ton of work to do, other days might be a dry spell. You’ll definitely be on your toes with freelancing. Frankly, it’s a tumultuous job, nothing is ever truly steady and secure (unless you have a solid client).

I worry a lot about this job. Can freelancing support me long term? Can I juggle multiple responsibilities at once? Would being a full time freelance writer ever be – enough? That uncertainty weighs me down. But, you take what you get, right?


Well, there you have it writer bugs, the pros and cons of being a freelance writer (from a lady freelancer). If you have any ideas for posts on this topic, let me know in the comments. To all the freelancers out there, what are some negatives to your job?

Write with heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

The Top Three Pros to Freelance Writing

Hello, hello!

Get ready for a new series on the Lady Jabberwocky blog, ‘Notes from a Lady Freelance Writer‘, where I’ll be sharing my candid experience as a Freelance Writer. I’ve been a Freelancing for about two years now, and it’s been quite an adventure for me. I want to give you guys an honest look at all the good and the bad that comes with a job like this.

Curious about what’s it’s like to be a Freelancer? Today, I’ll be talking about the benefits to a Freelance Writer job.

Be the Boss

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One of the perks to freelancing is that you are your own boss. Want to give yourself a day off? Feel like sleeping in? Honey, you go do that. Now, this does not mean you can forgo deadlines. However, you have the power to decide how you work and what you work on. Most of the time, you determine your workload. Remember, whatever freelance gig you decide to go for, you have to think of yourself as a service. Creating, editing and scheduling material is all part of the job.

I’ve written content for a few websites, all while producing my own content on this blog. I’ve learned how to communicate with clients and conduct myself like a one lady business. My main responsibilities are to manage orders, for articles or product descriptions, and manage payments. It’s on me to juggle multiple projects at once. Not gonna lie, you develop a little hustle along the way. And there’s nothing wrong with that.

No Commuting Time

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Travel expenses? What travel expenses? Working from home means little to no commuting. No need for a work wardrobe either. With expenses being so minimal, it really cuts work costs and monthly expenses. It really is a cost effective way to earn a little extra cash on the side. While it may seem like a luxury, it’s not all rainbows and sunshine working from home, but I’ll get to that in another post.

Personally, I love wearing comfy sweatshirts and leggings all day. For me, I just need a computer and a PayPal account. And an email I check constantly. That’s enough for me to sustain my job for now.

Work Anywhere, Anytime

The biggest benefit to freelancing is the freedom to determine your own schedule. You choose where your office gets to be, whether that’s in coffee shop or your own bed. Don’t get too comfortable, work still needs to get done. Still, you can create a productive space wherever you want.

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It’s all about time management and meeting deadlines. If you’ve got errand to run in the morning, moonlight as a writer at night. And vice versa. You just need to find the time that works best for your life. Hours are incredibly flexible, there’s no clock in or clock out with freelancing.


Hope you guys like hearing about my humble experience with being a freelance writer. Next time, I’ll talk about the cons of freelancing writing. To all my freelancers out there, what do you think are the benefits of a work from home job?

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

The Writers are Weird Tag

Hey Writer Bugs? You know what I haven’t done in awhile? A good ol’ tag.

Found this one on Jane Ridgewood‘s blog. Be sure to check her out!

Let’s jump right in, shall we?


01. Do you have bizarre internet searches? (if so, what’s the weirdest one?)

I mean, my WIP centers around a freakshow, so I’ve researched quite a bit on “circus freaks”, people born with abnormalities and showcased for profit. That’s the very definition of weird. Also, since I’m writing a murder mystery, I’ve had to search stuff about drowned victims and murder investigations during the 1920s. That’s sort of creepy and gorey. Thank goodness for private tabs, am I right?

02. Do you write people you know and dislike into your story as villains or dumb people to kill off?

Noooo, I would never. Well, there was this one time…. But no, I typically don’t use names of people I dislike in my stories. Frankly, I never found satisfaction from purposely killing off characters. That’s just me, though.

03. Does personal hygiene sometimes come second to writing?

Sometimes. Let’s be real here, this lady sometimes looks a tree monster. My greasy hair is always tied in a messy bun. In my defense, I’m a freelance writer that works from home. So I’m basically one of those disheveled hermits that writes all day. Don’t forget to take care of yourselves , writer bugs.

04. Do you go on baby name websites to help you name your characters?

OMG! I thought I was the only one who did that. Actually, those baby name websites are super helpful for naming characters. If I need a name with certain letters or of certain origin, those sites are my go to. It only gets awkward when the pop up window appears, asking if I’d like to track my pregnancy. I’m not pregnant, just searching for names for my fictional babies, that’s all, don’t mind me.

05. Do you have a list of actors and actresses that would play your characters if there was an adaptation made?

Pretty sure I’ve answered this question in my WIP tag. I don’t have an entire cast list in my head, I’m not that meticulous. However, I do think Andrew Garfield would be perfect for the role of Oscar Fitzgerald, the narrator. I always imagine Oscar with a cocky smirk on his face, and that actor fits the bill. Still, it’s strange to think of a film adaptation when I’m still in the drafting process. Wouldn’t want to get ahead of myself.

06. Have you ever stared at a stranger because they look like one of your characters?

No? But sometimes, I stare at strangers and wonder what kind of character they’d be. Ad that’s probably worse. Oh! I just remembered! My detective is an older gentleman with a bad limp and he walks with a cane. When I was riding the subway to college, I would watch elderly men with walking sticks and see how they moved. How they sat down, got up from their seat, and how they teetered around with a cane. It actually helped me work out the detective’s physicality.

07. Do you talk to yourself to help work through scenes? (if so, where do you talk to yourself?)

I tend to write out ideas on sticky notes. That’s just an easy way to unravel my thoughts. Just jotting quick notes down and sticking them up on the wall works for me. Post-it notes are everywhere though.

Also, talking to my boyfriend about my ideas allows me to work out my thoughts out loud. He’s not a writer, but he has an interesting viewpoint on stories and storytelling. Sometimes, you need the perspective of a reader/viewer, and not another writer.

08. While writing, do you make the expressions your characters are making?

Yes and I probably look like a crazy person. Especially when I’m writing a scene of conflict. Like if my characters are angry or upset, my face pinches in a scowl or a frown. Plus, I’m pretty sure I mouth lines of dialogue to myself. That’s when you know you’re really focused and invested in a scene. (Or you’ve completely lost your mind as a writer.)

09. Do you ever practice answering interview questions in case you “make it big?”

Yes, as embarrassing as that is to say. Although, my goal isn’t to “make it big”, it’s to published a book, no matter it’s success. Sometimes I’m nervous talking in front of people, words get jumbled in my mouth. I’m working on it, okay? But yeah, I’ve prepared some eloquent answers if ever I get interviewed by Oprah.

10. Do you have a soundtrack and/or playlists for your book or scenes from your book?

No, don’t think so. Should I have one?


I tag anyone who wants to do this tag.

Thanks for two wonderful years on WordPress, writer bees!

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

Changing My Main Character’s Name after 5 YEARS

Hello Writer Beans!

Well, It has been a busy, and emotionally exhausting, couple of days. Lots of work writing to do. However, I did have a small burst of inspiration for that work-in-progress novel of mine. Frankly, I’ve been struggling with writer’s block with my WIP. I jotted a couple of new ideas down, for whenever I find time to write for myself. Which, let me tell you, is such a luxury when you’re a freelance writer.

Then I had a thought. Recently, I’ve been thinking about changing the name of a character I have had for five years. Although this may be a difficult transition for me personally (He’s had the same name for years, calling him anything else will be strange), it’s been a nagging thought for the past couple weeks.

A Bit of Backstory

Years ago, I had an idea for a character, a detective named Henry B. Cooper (Later H.B. Cooper.) In short, he’s a grumpy old man, from across the pond, who resides in New York during the 1920’s. No matter what I was writing, this character was there in the back of my head, sitting in the living room of my brain, waiting for me to tell his story. “I’m right here, dear, whenever you’re ready.” (Me talking to imaginary people is probably unhealthy right?)

If you cracked open my head, this is what it’d look like inside.

After I graduated college, I wanted to write a novel. Although I was split between fantasy and mystery, my two most beloved genres, I ended up choosing mystery. I ended up choosing Mister Cooper. You’ve probably seen snippets of him in short stories I’ve posted on this blog. Even 5 years later, I’ve still very fond of him.

Recently, I’ve considered changing his name. As any writer knows, names are so important to the character. It’s like naming a child. (A fictional child that won’t stop bothering you. ) This blog is about creating an open dialogue for writers. So let’s pretend we’re in sweatpants, eating salty potato chips, and I’m trying to explain to you the reasoning behind renaming my first born.

Did The Research

Look, I’m not a historian, by any means. However, since I am writing a historical story, the facts have to be straight. The names I picked, for all the characters, had to fit the time period they lived in. Simply as that. For example, my narrator’s name is Oscar Fitzgerald. Not only does it reflect the early 1900s, it also reflects his heritage. And I wanted to do the same thing for the detective.

Me doing research at 1 in the morning.

I knew the last name ‘Cooper’ was a common English name, but I never dug deep into it. Apparently, in Victorian England, surnames often originated from religious text (Lewis, Thomas, James) or one’s occupation (Taylor, Baker, Smith). Since my detective is born during this era, these are factors I will have to take into consideration.

Other Coopers?

Okay, this might be a silly worry, but it still bugs me. H.B. Cooper is very similar to some other characters, both real and fictional, that I know of. First off, around the time I created Mister Cooper, my family got a dog, who coincidently, was also named Cooper. While I did like the fact that these two, unintentionally, shared a name, now I feel like the detective needs his own identity.

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How you see your Main Character.

Second, for the mystery nerds out there, H.B Cooper sounds a lot like D.B. Cooper. Plus there’s like two other detective Coopers in fiction already. I may be overthinking this, but I think my main character should have a moniker that stand out a bit more.

Thank You, Next

I have a couple ideas in mind for his new name. For some reason, I’ve always loved the name ‘Barnaby’, from an old Laurel and Hardy film I grew up with. Maybe I’ll play around with that. Frankly I still need to do more research. Once I find the right name, things should click into place. At least I hope.

You ever walk into a room and say to yourself, “Man, I should change the color of these walls.” Right now, I feel like this character needs a new coat of paint. It’s not a bad thing, it’s just something I think he needs. It’ll be hard, losing that name he’s had for years, but this is just a step in the evolution process. His personality and backstory won’t change, just his name tag.

Got any ideas for a name? I’m curious to see what you guys think. Also, have you ever had to change a longtime character’s name?

Have a lovely weekend everyone.

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky