Tag Archives: advice

The Top 5 Tips for Working at Home

Hello writer bees!

While it seems the entire world on lockdown, many folks have are now working from home. As a freelance writer, I was already remote working before it became the norm. Whether you are under quarantine or just don’t feel like trudging to the office, check out these helpful tips for working at home.

Create a Routine

Establish a schedule and work hours, like you would at your regular job. Some people just pretend they are in the office; That’s definitely one trick you can try. At the start of your day, plan out what needs to be done and what deadlines need to be met. Take off your pjs and bunny slippers and actually get dressed for success. It will ease you out of that “lazy day” headspace. And be sure to factor in break time too. Try to repeat the same routine each day and make working from home a habit.

Overcommunicate With Co-Workers

Communication is key in any field. With remote working, you and your co-workers should always be on the same page. There are plenty of chat room and virtual meeting applications to choose from, think about using one of them to connect with your team. No matter if it’s by email, phone call or video call, keep in touch with fellow employees frequently, even if it’s just a simple status update on a project.

Find a Work Space

Whether it’s at your desk, your kitchen table or your cozy bed, designate a productive, comfortable place to work in. Have everything you need within arms reach, like a computer or a notepad or a colorful assortment of pens. Is home a bit too noisy for you? Consider heading over to a local café or public library to do some work. Find the spot that works for you.

Avoid Distraction

I understand this is a tall order. Between social media and life responsibilities, it’s difficult to avoid distractions. Try to maintain focus as much as you can. Steer clear of the kitchen to avoid grazing on snacks throughout the day. Maybe invest in noise cancelling headphones or a ‘do not disturb’ sign. If possible, ask loved ones in your life to respect your work mode and give you some well deserved peace and quiet.

Take Care of Yourself

Don’t forget to take care of yourself. Have a break when needed. Walk around and strech your legs. Decompress when you are feeling stressed. If you’re feeling under the weather, don’t feel guilty about taking a sick day. Your physical and mental wellness is important, especially in times like this.


How are you all holding up during this pandemic? What’s working at home look like to you? Talk to me in the comments.

Stay safe out there, writer bees.

– Lady Jabberwocky

What Materials I’ve Written and How to Stay Versatile

Hello, writer bugs!

A couple of weeks ago, the flash flood typist suggested I write a post about what kind of materials I’ve written. 

So, today I’ll be going over everything I’ve ever had to write for clients. And after, I’ll tell you how you too can be versatile in freelance business. By no means am I bragging out this one of a kind job. I just never realized how eclectic my work experience would become. 

As a freelance writer, I’ve been tasked with writing a variety of different materials. Most of the time, I’m either producing content that is informative or that sells a product/service. Frankly, you never know what you’ll get in freelancing.

Food and Travel Blog Posts

Side note: For food I had never eaten and places I had never traveled to.

When I first started out as a writer working from home, my first gig was an unpaid internship at a travel blog. Titles mostly began with “Everything you need to know about…..” or “The best…”. Since I wasn’t heading to Disneyland anytime soon, posts involved a lot of research and cross referencing other sources. Even relying on the commentary of park goers. What delicious dishes were they raving about? I loved writing about the food scene at the Disney parks. 

For the rides, I’d look into the history of the ride itself. What makes the ride special? What actually riding the ride was like? Sometimes, I’d look up grainy videos of sneaky park goers filming the rides. 

Product Descriptions 

Yeah, I’ve written product descriptions for two vastly different companies. One was for a hardware supply company. And I know nothing about tools. Frankly, It all looked the same to me. I had to really focus on what the tools were made of and what their function was. 

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The second time I wrote product descriptions was for an ice cream business. And between you and me, I’m highly allergic to dairy and never had ice cream. So there’s that. As a writer, I simply put the spotlight on the texture and the flavor of their sweet creations. Using specific details and adjectives paints an appealing image for a potential buyer. 

Photography Packages

Recently, I’ve been working on packages for a photography site. I’ve picked up an upbeat, catchy voice, similar to a used car salesman. I’m charged with selling a “product”. My words need to convince someone to consider purchasing a professional photography session. And with only 150 words, the result is bite sized pieces presented like an elevator pitch. Short, sweet and to the point.  

Comic Reviews (~700 words) 

For over a year, I wrote weekly comic book reviews for a nerdy website. Reading comics isn’t all fun and games. Following the site’s strict criteria and a rating system, I judged the art styles and the plot lines of some DC Comics publications. Also, I was exposed to other genres I never thought to read. And I liked expressing my dorky side through writing. 

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There’s a bit of pressure offering my opinion on published works and collaborating with editors. Like, who am I to say what’s a great issue and what’s a bad issue? I’m just a lady freelance writer. However, I did learn about the backend workings of composing an article. Tags, links, images, all those bells and whistles behind blog posts.  

Articles about Anything (~1,000 to 2,000 words)

Lots of different topics. Everything from Vegan snacks to Baby Shark. (Yes, the viral video baby shark).  I mean, I could have a post about the oddball articles I’ve written alone. I probably will eventually. When I was on Fiverr, I would just receive random orders from random people. Like party mix. Starting out as a freelance writer will seem like that at first. And hello, writer bees. Of course, I write articles here on Lady Jabberwocky for you lovely folks. 

Be Versatile and Flexible

With the freelance writer job, you are providing a service. Paying customers are coming up to you with their orders. Here’s the thing about freelancing; Some potential clients may ask for something “off the menu”, something you aren’t openly offering on your platform. You might miss out on an opportunity if you only write one type of written material.  

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Bear in mind, the more you offer, the larger the workload. Take that as you will. More money or more stress? (Not that I’m rolling in cash anyway). That being said, you’re allowed to turn down prospects that just aren’t up your alley. However, be open and flexible to other forms of content, any new experience can be rewarding. 

You want to reassure clients that you can handle anything they throw at you. 


What else do you guys want to know about being a freelance writer. For my fellow freelancers, what materials do you like (or dislike) writing? How do you stay flexible in your work? Also, I’m coming up on 200 followers. What should I do to celebrate? Let me know in the comments! I’d love to hear from you!

– Lady Jabberwocky

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3 Tips on Creating Likeable Antagonists

Mayday! Mayday!

You’re writing a story, minding your own business, when suddenly, a character you’re creating is taking a nose dive right into unlikable jerk territory. Let’s try to save your character from being total terror.

Whether they be hot tempered, or rude, or just have a nasty attitude,  you have created a character who is nothing but bad qualities. An unpleasant fellow in every regard. Yes, there are antagonists and villains and personified rain clouds, however, is that all they are? Just… the bad guy?

Here are some tips for creating a character we love to hate (and not hate to hate).

Changing Point of View

If your story involves multiple narratives, consider having your jerk character try on the narrator hat for a bit. How do they see the world? Are they really as nasty as they seem? What are their home lives like? Is there a reason for their misbehavior? Take a walk in their shoes. By doing this, it can give the reader insight to that character’s backstory and perspective.

Create Obstacles

Let there a be a struggle that shows another side of their character. The reader will gain a level of empathy for this character if they see them face some kind of hardship. Maybe the character learns from their past mistakes? Or feels guilt about something? Or has to face a real, serious conflict, either internal or external. Give the character a hill to climb over.

Give Them a Redeemable Trait

Anything. There has to be something good. No matter how horrible and cruel someone is, there must be some redeemable quality. Are they charming? Quick witted? Hard working? Show some level of respect or affection towards another? Like animals? (Who doesn’t like puppies?) You catch my drift. Any sort of positive trait to balance out the not so positive traits.


Don’t just have a character who is only recognized by the reader as being a terrible person. Real characters, like real people, need a balance in order to be complex.

Hope this helps some writer out there. In the comments, let me know who your favorite bad guy character you love to hate.

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky.

The Secrets Behind Creating a Memorable Detective Character

Hello Writer Bees!

At the center of any great murder mystery is a great detective. Whether they are an amateur sleuth, a private inspector or a member of law enforcement, this is the character, or team, that is the heart of any whodunit. Let’s talk about the behind the scenes secrets to creating a detective character.

Be Inspired By Classic Detectives

Buster Keaton in Sherlock Junior (1924)

Before you dive right into character creation, consider the fictional detectives from classic murder mysteries. Right off the bat, we think of notable inspectors like Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot. Of course, there are many more sleuths in detective fiction, explore and read as much as you can. Diversity is crucial in this research. Once you’ve read a bunch of different mysteries, focus in on a few characters. What stands out with them? What about them catches your attention as a reader? Really think about makes those characters memorable. Be inspired by the characters and artists that came before you. Then, put your own twist on the conventional detective and be original.

What’s in a Name?

You gotta admit, some detectives out have some pretty unique names. The kind of names that turn heads, and draw people in. No, this does not mean you must frivolously choose the most ridiculous name you can think of. Be mindful about the character’s name. Feel free to play around with uncommon names. Ever heard of Harry Potter and Percy Jackson? There’s a reason those names stick in our minds.

Image result for poirot gif

If you are a loyal follower of the Lady Jabberwocky blog, you’ll know that I am currently deliberating over names for my detective. I’m considering where he is from and what sounds easy on the ears. Since he will be the main character, his name must resonate the reader in some way.

Method to the Madness

Image result for detective poirot order quote method

Next, let’s talk about method, how the detective works. Do they use brute force and bust heads to gather information? Or do they inspect for clues with a magnifying class? Or is there a special ability at work? Whatever the case, there must be a rhyme and reason to every action during their investigation. However, it’s more than just method. It’s how they navigate the world and how they interact with other people. What’s their relationship with their sidekick? How do they interrogate suspects? Really take a walk in their shoes.

The Need to Investigate

Not only should you consider how they investigate, but why they investigate. Why are they inspectors? Why does the detective solve cases? Behind every sleuth lies their motivation, the drive that compels them to unravel mysteries. Are whodunits just big puzzles for them? Or do they have a high moral values? Or are they personally connected to the crime in some way? Explore the reason why your character is in this business, or at least in a position to investigate and find the culprit.

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Plus, this would be a good time to think about a catchphrase. A bit cheesy but some characters do well with a tagline. For my main character, he lives by the idea that “Life should end in a period, not a question mark.” A personal philosophy like this one can highlight one’s motive and goal, and help the reader understand the character better.

Quirks and Odd Habits

It’s those little idiosyncrasies that make a character realistic. Detectives should be eccentric, odd balls. They should have quirks and peculiar traits, like something is a little off about them. Yes, Poirot is a genius, but what makes him memorable is his need for order and precision. Does your inspector have any odd habits when in thought? If you think about it, we all have our strange quirks. For this character, dial those traits up a notch, to be extra weird and interesting. Frankly, they should be borderline alien.

Image result for columbo gif

Wrapping Up May Of Mystery

When creating a sleuth, every decision must be a conscious, specific one. Be mindful of their name, how they work, and what odd traits define them. Think of a detective as another breed of fictional character. Trust me, the world does not need more carbon copies of Holmes.

The case is officially closed. With this post, May of Mystery comes to an end. It really was a fun month, writer bees. Hope you all learned something about detective fiction. What genre themed month should I do next? Let me know in the comments. I’d love to hear your ideas.

Also, I just want to take a minute to proclaim my undying appreciation for my first patron, Mister Michael from NY. I love you to the moon and back. Check out my Patreon and help support me and this blog. Every little bit helps. Thanks everyone!

Write with heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

What Rewards Should Be on My Patreon?

Writer Bees! I need your help!

(Total Dora the Explorer style)

So, I have that pesky Patreon of mine. But I want to change up some rewards, maybe even add another tier or two. Since I’m thinking about including more stories on this blog, I want to change the $15 and $25 tiers a bit. Lately, I’ve been trying to brainstorm ideas for possible rewards. Things to truly show my appreciation for your support.

While I have some ideas, but I want to know what you guys think.

How cool would a physical gift from Lady Jabberwocky be? A present, like stickers or a bookmark, you could have in your hand and use. Also, maybe a book giveaway every month. That’d be fun too. I’m determined to make this blog and this Patreon grow and be more engaging to you guys.

Have any ideas? Let me know in the comments. Seriously, I’m open to anything. And if you too have a Patreon, just out of curiosity, what are the rewards you offer?

Thank you everyone!

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

5 Types of Narrators in Story Writing – Breaking Down the Basics

Hello Writer Bugs!

Today, we are going back to basics in story writing. What point of view is best for your WIP? Let’s break down the different kinds of narrators in a story.

(Psst! Don’t forget to check out that Patreon page! Keep this party going! )

First Person Narrator

Pronouns: I, my, me.

Example: The Narrator from Moby Dick. ” Call me Ishmael.”

First Person is a very personal perspective. The reader has a front row seat to this character’s feelings, thoughts and experience in the world. This can be either a main character or a distant observer. By using the first person narrative, it puts a limit to what the narrator, and the reader, knows and doesn’t know. This kind of narrator cannot know

Second Person Narrator

Pronouns: You, Your.

A Second Person Narrator talks directly to the audience, enveloping the reader into the story itself. Think of it like playing a choose your own adventure game, where the reader is a character. “You do this, you see that.” This one is quite rare in fiction; It’s more for technical writing. It’s difficult to perfect, but not impossible, so don’t be discouraged to experiment with this style.

Example: If I’m remembering correctly, Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern has some chapters using second person that are utterly enchanting.

Third Person Narrator (Limited)

Pronouns: He, she, they.

Another popular option that gives the writer more freedom to move around, follow multiple characters and explore multiple rooms of the house, so to speak. Usually, the third person narrator isn’t an actual character at all. It’s a more objective viewpoint, which can lead to a lack of connection with the reader. The audience is privy to more information about the plot, information the main characters may not even be aware of, but not the characters personal thoughts and feelings.

Omniscient Narrator

Usually third person. Uses ‘he, she, they’ pronouns.

With this one, the narrator knows everything, from feelings to inner thoughts. Imagine an all knowing, all seeing God-like being looking down at the world and relaying the story to the reader. Some can argue that it’s the author themselves telling the story. I’ll let you be the judge.

Unreliable Narrator

Usually first person, usually undependable.

Some narrators just can’t be trusted, can they? The viewpoint of this narrator is very biased, clouded by their own, possibly flawed judgement. Other characters in the story may not be described accurately because of the narrator’s own perception. Certain events can be skewed. Even the narrator himself could be not what he appears to be

Example: Check out the narrator from The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie. He may know more about the murder than he is letting on. Wink wink.

Choose Your Narrator Wisely

Really take the time to think about whom the narrator will be and how well they can tell your/their story. It’s important for the reader to really connect and be engaged with the character or viewpoint chosen. Think of it like this, the narrator is the reader’s vehicle as they ride the rollercoaster that is your story. That makes sense right?

If you are struggling to decide which narrative you want to use, try multiple styles. No harm in experimenting. It’s like reading an essay for school out loud before handing it in. You’ll know what fits your story best when you read it.

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky