Tag Archives: creative writing

400 Followers, 300 Posts and One Giant Thank You!

Hello writer bees!

Today is the day for celebrating milestones.

Lady Jabberwocky has reached 400 followers.

Plus, I’ve written my 300th post for this blog.

Yes, in the grand scheme of things, these are small accomplishments. However, amidst the gloom and doom, I’m trying to grasp those specks of goodness in my life.

There was a time when I had a WordPress account but was too scared to post anything. Would anybody really care about what I had to say? Now, 300 posts later, I never thought this humble blog would go this far.

Not only do I share my experience as a writer here, Lady Jabberwocky is my way of supporting other writers. That will always be the main goal behind my content.

Thank you for every like, comment, follow and share.

All the love and support from you wonderful folks keeps me going.

Feel free to take a look at my most recent posts.

– Lady Jabberwocky

Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

Writer On: July Writing Goals

Hello Writer Bees!

Time to fly by July and set some new writing goals.

If you’d like, take a look at my June and last month’s recap.


Writing Plans

  • Write 200-300 words a day.
  • More research on 1920s (to help with descriptions).
  • Tweak character profiles.
  • Write a short story for the blog.

Reading Goals


What do you guys think of my goals? And what are your writing plans for this month? Talk to me in the comments!

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

Prompt of the Week: Non-Binary Pals

Create a non-binary character.

Consider their point of view in regards to gender identity.


Want a good book to read for Pride Month? Check out my list of 5 LGBTQ books to read!

Write your response in the comments below. Best entry gets a shout out next week!

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky


Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

5 LGBTQ Books to Read for Pride Month

Hey writer bees!

Diversity in storytelling is so important. Every kind of person should be represented and represented well. No matter the story, the characters need to feel realistic. That includes their sexuality and gender identity.

In honor of Pride Month, I’m sharing some colorful books that celebrate the LGBTQ community.

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel

Distant and exacting, Bruce Bechdel was an English teacher and director of the town funeral home, which Alison and her family referred to as the “Fun Home.” It was not until college that Alison, who had recently come out as a lesbian, discovered that her father was also gay. A few weeks after this revelation, he was dead, leaving a legacy of mystery for his daughter to resolve.

I’ve read this book, and let me tell you, it’s an outstanding story. Alison Bechdel is an exceptional and brave writer. Full of humor and heartbreak, I couldn’t recommend this graphic memoir any higher. You don’t have to be queer to feel touched by her life story. Seriously, Fun Home is a must-have in your book collection.

Amazon.com: Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic eBook: Bechdel, Alison ...

The Art of Being Normal by Lisa Williamson

On the first day at his new school, Leo Denton has one goal: to be invisible. Attracting the attention of the most beautiful girl in his class is definitely not part of that plan–especially because Leo is a trans guy and isn’t out at his new school.

Written in first person narrative, Lisa Williamson tells the story of two transgender students who are navigating their gender identity. Based on reviews, it’s a great exploration of what it means to be transgender today. This one is definitely on my To-Be-Read list!

The Art of Being Normal by Lisa Williamson - review | Children's ...

Prince and Knight – Daniel Haack (Author), Stevie Lewis (Illustrator)

In this modern fairy tale, a noble prince and a brave knight come together to defeat a terrible monster and in the process find true love in a most unexpected place.

Not every prince is looking for a fair maiden. If you want to introduce the youngsters in your life to inclusivity and the LGBTQ community, look no further than this charming children’s book. This fairytale is colorful and magical and incredibly sweet. Frankly, I might buy this book for my nephew, so he can learn about acceptance and love in all forms.

Prince & Knight (Mini Bee Board Books): Haack, Daniel, Lewis ...

Stonewall: The Definitive Story of the LGBTQ Rights Uprising that Changed America

On June 28, 1969, the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in New York’s Greenwich Village, was raided by police. But instead of responding with the typical compliance the NYPD expected, patrons and a growing crowd decided to fight back. The five days of rioting that ensued changed forever the face of gay and lesbian life.

For all the history buffs out there, this is the book for you. A masterful, powerful retelling of the Stonewall Riots and the first gay rights march, written by historian Martin Duberman. With everything going on in the world right now, this piece of work is so relevant and on the pulse. Learning about our history is important, now more than ever.

Stonewall: The Definitive Story of the LGBT Rights Uprising that Changed America by [Martin B.  Duberman]

This Book is Gay by Juno Dawson

There’s a long-running joke that, after “coming out,” a lesbian, gay guy, bisexual, or trans person should receive a membership card and instruction manual. THIS IS THAT INSTRUCTION MANUAL. You’re welcome.

Lighthearted and informative, this is the unofficial guide to being gay and/or curious. Inside, there’s candid answers to any and all LGBTQ related questions. No matter your sexual preference, this book makes for a great gift and an even greater addition to your bookshelf.

This Book Is Gay by Juno Dawson, Paperback | Barnes & Noble®

As writers, as readers, as humans, let’s expand our horizons and promote inclusivity in everything we do.

What’s your favorite LGBTQ book? Lemme know in the comments.

Write with heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

Writer On: June Writing Goals (Recap)

Hello Writer Bees!

While the world turned upside down, did I reach my writing goals for this month? Keep reading to find out.


Writing Plans

  • Try to write a little everyday. – Slowly but surely, this novel is getting written. I still have my battles with writer’s block, like everyone does. However, I’m still trying to write a little each day. Even if it’s like 100 words. Something is something.
  • Decide whether to cut character out of story or not. For the past few weeks, I’ve been think about removing a character from the story. He wasn’t a bad character, far from it. He just didn’t fit well into the cast of characters. I forced him into scenes he didn’t need to be a part of. Once I trimmed this character out, I was actually relieved and excited about changing things up. Hopefully, my writer instinct is right on this decision.
  • More research on the roaring 1920s. – The setting of my WIP is 1920s New York City. When writing historical fiction, research is crucial. I felt a bit disconnected from that time period. This month, I took more time to do more research, finding vintage photos and new sources. And my Brooklyn in the 1920s book is a helpful companion on my bookshelf too.

Reading Goals

  • Read Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald A good read, in my opinion. The story centers around Zelda Fitzgerald and her relationship with F. Scott Fitzgerald. If you are interested in this iconic couple or the roaring twenties, I recommend this book!
  • Continue to read over draft.Oh, my poor WIP. So much to do, so little time. Honestly though, reading over the draft shows me what work needs to be done, especially now that I’ve remove a character altogether. And reading it through helps with writer’s block too.

How did your writing endeavors go for this month? Talk to me in the comments! I love to hear from you guys. Also, click those links please, it helps support this blog.

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

Prompt of the Week: The Coming Out Story

Write about your coming out story.

or

Write about a character coming out and sharing their truth.


In honor of pride month, be proud of your story.

Write your response in the comments below. Best entry gets a shout out next week!

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky


Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

Proud Colors (LGBTQ Flash Fiction)

Red. Red is the color of romance and passion and successful first dates. This red did not cut it. Need a darker shade of red. Like glass of chilled Merlot red. Like matching his football jersey red. Makeup remover to the rescue. I viciously wiped Ruby Explosion off my lips. What else is there? Tickled Pink. Burnt Berry. Cherry Pop will have to do.

Mascara gives me eye lashes like Ramona Ortega from down the street. That girl has ridiculously long eyelashes. And curvature like no other. I’m built like a tall can of beer. Light beer. The kind women pretend to enjoy at Super Bowl parties. Mascara can’t give me curves like her.

Eyeliner is a game. Playing connect the dots with you eyelids. I always manage to draw outside the lines. “Al,” My sister stands in the doorway, folding her arms across her chest. There’s a constellation of freckles scattered across her nose. A smile curls onto her lips. This week, Pepper dyed her hair purple. Purple. The color of childhood dinosaurs and artists on the brink of insanity. Moody purple is tied into a top knot. “Need help?”

My hands brace against the granite counter. Doubt is grey, if you look at it close enough. Grey creeps along the shell of my ear. “Be honest, Pep. Do I look like a clown?” I ask because a clown was definitely staring back at me in the mirror. What if baby deer eyelashes isn’t enough to win him over? What if cherry red lipstick isn’t enough to earn a goodnight kiss?

She stands beside me, offering a simple shake of her head. “Are we going for beautiful or handsome tonight?” She asks as she skillfully traces my eyelid with the pen. Like an artist at her canvas.

A laugh hiccups in my chest. “Both, if I’m lucky.”

“Good. Because you look like both,” Pepper straightens my jacket and runs her fingers through my hair. An encouraging, motherly touch that came from my sister. Stew together yellow, orange and gold and you’ll end up with a bowl of encouragement and pride. “He is gonna fall head over heels for you. I mean, he’d have to. You’re the only guy crazy enough to wear a full face of makeup to a roller skating rink.” She adds as she finishes a near perfect cat eye with a flourish.

I face off against my reflection and dust the nerves off my shoulder. The doorbell rings. A kaleidoscope rattles in my brain. He’s early. With a playful wink, she pats me on the shoulder.

“Go get ’em, Albert.”


To everyone celebrating Pride Month, this one’s for you.

– Lady Jabberwocky

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How to Choose a Read Worthy Book Title

Hello writer bees!

If there’s any silver lining to this chaotic time, it’s that writers are using their time to work on new projects. And with new projects comes a daunting task; Choosing the perfect title. It’s a huge question for any writer with a WIP. How do you create an interesting title that catches the readers attention and perfectly represents your story?

Today, I’m showing you what story elements can lead you to a read worthy title. Here are some ideas for where you can find the name of your book.

Character Inspired Titles

Image result for gatsby gif

If you have a character focused piece, pick a title that highlights the main character. Although it might be a simplistic option, a book named after a protagonist can be compelling to potential readers. And it doesn’t necessarily need to be the character’s name either. Think about the role the character plays in their world.

Examples

Setting Themed Titles

Consider naming the book after a prominent location featured in the story. Do the characters live in a specific town or residence? Or are they traveling to a certain destination? Settings transport the audience to a different time and place. Intrigue your readers with an invitation to a new world.

Examples

Memorable Line or Object

See the source image

Is the adventure centered around a coveted object? Or is there a sentence/phrase that sums up the entire novel? A memorable line or item featured in the story can become a great book title. Search through the text and find those stand out bits that you feel represent the entire novel well.

Examples

Bonus Tips for Book Titles

  • Represent the right genre: If you pick a title that sounds like a fantasy story but it’s really a murder mystery, reader will be confused. Choose a title that reflects the genre. Research book titles in your preferred genre before naming.
  • Understand the theme: What themes does the novel explore? Underlying themes can be transformed into thematic phrases. Theme inspired titles give a nod to the audience of what the story is about. (ex. Pride and Prejudice)
  • Look through bookshelf: Check out your bookshelf, or the shelves at a library or bookstore. As a reader, what kind of titles catch your attention? Novels from other writers may inspire a title for your own piece.

Bottom Line

When coming up with a book title, focus on the core elements of the story. A character, a setting or even a memorable line can become a read worthy title.

What is the title of your WIP/Novel and how did you choose it? What are some of your favorite book titles? Lemme know in the comments.

Stay safe and keep writing!

Lady Jabberwocky

Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

Prompt of the Week: The Book that Heals your Heart

What book always cheers you up and heals your heart when you are feeling down?


For me, Lin-Manuel Miranda’s G’Morning, G’Night: Little Pep Talks for Me and You and Nina George’s The Little Paris Bookshop always refill my spirit when I’m feeling blue.

Write your response in the comments below. Best entry gets a shout out next week!

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky


Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

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