Tag Archives: encouragement

400 Followers, 300 Posts and One Giant Thank You!

Hello writer bees!

Today is the day for celebrating milestones.

Lady Jabberwocky has reached 400 followers.

Plus, I’ve written my 300th post for this blog.

Yes, in the grand scheme of things, these are small accomplishments. However, amidst the gloom and doom, I’m trying to grasp those specks of goodness in my life.

There was a time when I had a WordPress account but was too scared to post anything. Would anybody really care about what I had to say? Now, 300 posts later, I never thought this humble blog would go this far.

Not only do I share my experience as a writer here, Lady Jabberwocky is my way of supporting other writers. That will always be the main goal behind my content.

Thank you for every like, comment, follow and share.

All the love and support from you wonderful folks keeps me going.

Feel free to take a look at my most recent posts.

– Lady Jabberwocky

Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

5 LGBTQ Books to Read for Pride Month

Hey writer bees!

Diversity in storytelling is so important. Every kind of person should be represented and represented well. No matter the story, the characters need to feel realistic. That includes their sexuality and gender identity.

In honor of Pride Month, I’m sharing some colorful books that celebrate the LGBTQ community.

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel

Distant and exacting, Bruce Bechdel was an English teacher and director of the town funeral home, which Alison and her family referred to as the “Fun Home.” It was not until college that Alison, who had recently come out as a lesbian, discovered that her father was also gay. A few weeks after this revelation, he was dead, leaving a legacy of mystery for his daughter to resolve.

I’ve read this book, and let me tell you, it’s an outstanding story. Alison Bechdel is an exceptional and brave writer. Full of humor and heartbreak, I couldn’t recommend this graphic memoir any higher. You don’t have to be queer to feel touched by her life story. Seriously, Fun Home is a must-have in your book collection.

Amazon.com: Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic eBook: Bechdel, Alison ...

The Art of Being Normal by Lisa Williamson

On the first day at his new school, Leo Denton has one goal: to be invisible. Attracting the attention of the most beautiful girl in his class is definitely not part of that plan–especially because Leo is a trans guy and isn’t out at his new school.

Written in first person narrative, Lisa Williamson tells the story of two transgender students who are navigating their gender identity. Based on reviews, it’s a great exploration of what it means to be transgender today. This one is definitely on my To-Be-Read list!

The Art of Being Normal by Lisa Williamson - review | Children's ...

Prince and Knight – Daniel Haack (Author), Stevie Lewis (Illustrator)

In this modern fairy tale, a noble prince and a brave knight come together to defeat a terrible monster and in the process find true love in a most unexpected place.

Not every prince is looking for a fair maiden. If you want to introduce the youngsters in your life to inclusivity and the LGBTQ community, look no further than this charming children’s book. This fairytale is colorful and magical and incredibly sweet. Frankly, I might buy this book for my nephew, so he can learn about acceptance and love in all forms.

Prince & Knight (Mini Bee Board Books): Haack, Daniel, Lewis ...

Stonewall: The Definitive Story of the LGBTQ Rights Uprising that Changed America

On June 28, 1969, the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in New York’s Greenwich Village, was raided by police. But instead of responding with the typical compliance the NYPD expected, patrons and a growing crowd decided to fight back. The five days of rioting that ensued changed forever the face of gay and lesbian life.

For all the history buffs out there, this is the book for you. A masterful, powerful retelling of the Stonewall Riots and the first gay rights march, written by historian Martin Duberman. With everything going on in the world right now, this piece of work is so relevant and on the pulse. Learning about our history is important, now more than ever.

Stonewall: The Definitive Story of the LGBT Rights Uprising that Changed America by [Martin B.  Duberman]

This Book is Gay by Juno Dawson

There’s a long-running joke that, after “coming out,” a lesbian, gay guy, bisexual, or trans person should receive a membership card and instruction manual. THIS IS THAT INSTRUCTION MANUAL. You’re welcome.

Lighthearted and informative, this is the unofficial guide to being gay and/or curious. Inside, there’s candid answers to any and all LGBTQ related questions. No matter your sexual preference, this book makes for a great gift and an even greater addition to your bookshelf.

This Book Is Gay by Juno Dawson, Paperback | Barnes & Noble®

As writers, as readers, as humans, let’s expand our horizons and promote inclusivity in everything we do.

What’s your favorite LGBTQ book? Lemme know in the comments.

Write with heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

How to Choose a Read Worthy Book Title

Hello writer bees!

If there’s any silver lining to this chaotic time, it’s that writers are using their time to work on new projects. And with new projects comes a daunting task; Choosing the perfect title. It’s a huge question for any writer with a WIP. How do you create an interesting title that catches the readers attention and perfectly represents your story?

Today, I’m showing you what story elements can lead you to a read worthy title. Here are some ideas for where you can find the name of your book.

Character Inspired Titles

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If you have a character focused piece, pick a title that highlights the main character. Although it might be a simplistic option, a book named after a protagonist can be compelling to potential readers. And it doesn’t necessarily need to be the character’s name either. Think about the role the character plays in their world.

Examples

Setting Themed Titles

Consider naming the book after a prominent location featured in the story. Do the characters live in a specific town or residence? Or are they traveling to a certain destination? Settings transport the audience to a different time and place. Intrigue your readers with an invitation to a new world.

Examples

Memorable Line or Object

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Is the adventure centered around a coveted object? Or is there a sentence/phrase that sums up the entire novel? A memorable line or item featured in the story can become a great book title. Search through the text and find those stand out bits that you feel represent the entire novel well.

Examples

Bonus Tips for Book Titles

  • Represent the right genre: If you pick a title that sounds like a fantasy story but it’s really a murder mystery, reader will be confused. Choose a title that reflects the genre. Research book titles in your preferred genre before naming.
  • Understand the theme: What themes does the novel explore? Underlying themes can be transformed into thematic phrases. Theme inspired titles give a nod to the audience of what the story is about. (ex. Pride and Prejudice)
  • Look through bookshelf: Check out your bookshelf, or the shelves at a library or bookstore. As a reader, what kind of titles catch your attention? Novels from other writers may inspire a title for your own piece.

Bottom Line

When coming up with a book title, focus on the core elements of the story. A character, a setting or even a memorable line can become a read worthy title.

What is the title of your WIP/Novel and how did you choose it? What are some of your favorite book titles? Lemme know in the comments.

Stay safe and keep writing!

Lady Jabberwocky

Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

Pick-Me-Up Gift Ideas for Struggling Writers

Hello writer bees,

With all the chaos in the world, some of us have a lot to say, and creating art is a great outlet. Now more than ever, an ounce of kindness goes a long way. Sending a small gift to a loved one says you are thinking of them, that you support them, and that you encourage their writing endeavors during this complicated time. Whether you want to spoil yourself or another writer in your life, check out these ideas of uplifting gifts for writers.

Mugs, Glasses and Other Goblets of Victory

It goes without saying, but I think we all need a comforting drink right about now. As cheesy as it sounds, a cute mug won’t go to waste in a writer’s home. And why not add these adorable literary tea bags? If the writer is in the editing process, maybe sending them a spiffy wine glass would be best. No matter coffee drinker, a tea drinker or a adult beverage drinker, raise a glass to the writer in your life.

Desk Essentials

Yes, you might be stuck at your desk, but you want to feel content and creative in that space. Consider purchasing some cute decorations or some useful office supplies. Like these hilarious scented candles that may or may no cure writer’s block. Also, note cards with words of encouragement would be nice too. I have this typewriter pencil holder on my desk that I absolutely adore. And trust me, I go through sticky notes like there’s no tomorrow. A thoughtful token for someone’s workspace is like a friendly reminder that there are loved ones out there cheering you on.

Aspiring Author Apparel

Let’s be honest, who wants to write their story wearing slacks, or a tie, or high heels? That’s right, nobody. Hoodies, t-shirts and socks, oh my! Some really enjoy wearing comfy clothing with a literary flair. Consider sending a fellow writer a cozy sweater to show off their bookworm pride. Even comfortable pajamas will do. Wearing something warm and snuggly is like a long distance hug they’ll be sure to appreciate. And with social distancing, I think we all need a long distance hug right now.

Weapons Against Writer’s Block

Many writers are struggling with writer’s block during lockdown. Myself included. Help get those creative juices flowing again. I’ve seen quite a few items online that help with fun writing prompts and exercises. This Writer’s Toolbox looks so fun. Also, journals can be used to plan out plots, jot down ideas or keep a WIP on track. And if they don’t use them, that’s fine. Plenty of writers out there with a unused journal collection. You know who you are.

Buy More Books

Sometimes, all we want is to escape reality and curl up with a good book. If you or another writer read or write a specific genre, buy a book from that genre. Or share a book that you are reading that made you think of them. One of my favorites is Lin-Manuel Miranda’s G’Morning, G’Night: Little Pep Talks for Me and You. I open that book anytime I’m feeling blue.


While my blog may be a small platform, I still want to do my part in encouraging and supporting writers during this chaotic time. To anyone reading this, spread a little love to all the creatives out there. We’re in this together. Let’s fight negativity with creativity.

Stay safe and keep writing, writer bees!

– Lady Jabberwocky

The Artist Who Paints Sunflowers (Flash Fiction)

My therapist told me, for once, write a happy story. What a writing prompt for a gloom and doom writer such as myself. A difficult task, I admit, what with all the death and tragedy and misfortune in the world. I sat at my writing desk, pouring a glass of whisky and pushing notes of cynicism aside. Like some Peter Pan, I instead grasped for blissful thoughts.

Then, I thought of Gertrude. A friend, you could say.

A twinkling lost soul in a lost generation. Worries never seem to stain her coat. I can’t recall where she lives, but wherever it is, summer is eternal. Her life is simple. Perched on her sunny balcony like an exotic parrot, she paints flowers at her wooden easel. Daisies, roses, poppies. Sunflowers are her favorite.

When Gertrude laughs, her head tilts back and expels champagne bubbles from her lungs. With Sinatra crooning through the speakers, she slow dances with lovers in the living room. She relishes even the most boring of dinner conversation. A nymph perfectly content with simply existing.

Every morning, she returns to that easel, a servant to the art. She makes love to colors on a blank canvas. Gold drips from her paintbrush. Satisfaction curves her lips into a smile. Leaning back with a mugful of coffee, she appreciates her painting. A sunflower smiles back at her.

Gertrude is fiction.

A mere wisp of delight on a page. Although I would not be surprised if some form of Gertrude walks the earth today, an artist who paints sunflowers on a light soaked balcony. Still, there is a joy that comes with flights of fiction, isn’t there?

Perhaps my therapist was right about these so-called happy stories.


The other day, I was talking to my boyfriend about what I should post for you all during quarantine, to help uplift other writers. He simply said “Write a story. People want to read happy stories right now, to take their mind off things.”

Thank you to my better half for inspiring this story.

Keep writing, writer bees, and stay safe.

– Lady Jabberwocky

Supporting Writers During the Quarantine

Hello writer bugs!

It’s been another long week here in New York. Everyday, there’s bad news. I’m doing my best to keep my head above water. Last week, I shared my bucket list, in hopes of lifting some spirits. And it worked. Your comments really touched me.

It feels a little wrong to continue with my usual content. This blog may be small, but it’s still a platform. And if I can help other writers get through lockdown and stay positive, I’m gonna try my best.

In an effort to support writers during these difficult times, I am opening the floor to you guys. What do you want to see on this blog? More short stories? More lighthearted humor? Tips on blogging, freelancing or creative writing?

Trust me, there are no bad ideas. I just feel like doing my part as a writer.

Speaking of support writers, I have also been considering a Ko-Fi account, to be a tip jar for you guys. What do you think of that idea? If any of you have experience with Ko-Fi, tell me all about it in the comments.

Writers need to support other writers. We’re all in this together. So, reach out to your fellow writers on social media. Share your stories. In all this madness, let’s keep the creativity flowing.

Looking forward to hearing from you writer bees.

Stay safe out there.

Love, Lady Jabberwocky

Writer Services // Follow Me on Twitter

Things to Do Before ____: The Bucket List Tag

Hello writer bees.

It’s been a long week. And if I’m honest, I’ve feeling a little drained. It seems like everyone is struggling during this pandemic, both emotionally and health wise. Really reminds you how short life is, huh?

One of my goals for 2020 is to be more positive. I’m not a motivational speaker. I’m just a writer trying to keep her head above water. And the last time I was about to fall down the rabbit hole of deep depression, I started writing a list of things I hope to do in my life. It’s a note on my phone, titled ‘things to do before ____’. Before what? Before I turned 30? Before I die? It never felt right for me to fill in the blank, not sure why. Regardless, this ever growing list keeps my spirit up when I need it.

Then I stumbled on the Bucket List tag, where you write 10 things you want to do in your life. And now, here we are. This is my bucket list.

  • Write and publish a novel.
  • Get a bunch of tiny tattoos.
  • Go to Disney World and possibly Disneybound.
  • See a Ballet.
  • Mentor young writers.
  • Adopt a rescue dog or cat.
  • Travel to Baltimore.
  • Learn to cook healthy.
  • Visit a NYC Speakeasy.
  • Find a Blog Sponsor for Lady Jabberwocky. (wink wink)

Probably no one will be interested in this post, and that’s fine. But maybe, someone out there will start their own list and feel a little uplifted. I think we all need a pick me up right about now.

Share your bucket list on your own blog/social media or leave it in the comments here.

Stay well and stay safe, everyone.

– Lady Jabberwocky

The Top 5 Tips for Working at Home

Hello writer bees!

While it seems the entire world on lockdown, many folks have are now working from home. As a freelance writer, I was already remote working before it became the norm. Whether you are under quarantine or just don’t feel like trudging to the office, check out these helpful tips for working at home.

Create a Routine

Establish a schedule and work hours, like you would at your regular job. Some people just pretend they are in the office; That’s definitely one trick you can try. At the start of your day, plan out what needs to be done and what deadlines need to be met. Take off your pjs and bunny slippers and actually get dressed for success. It will ease you out of that “lazy day” headspace. And be sure to factor in break time too. Try to repeat the same routine each day and make working from home a habit.

Overcommunicate With Co-Workers

Communication is key in any field. With remote working, you and your co-workers should always be on the same page. There are plenty of chat room and virtual meeting applications to choose from, think about using one of them to connect with your team. No matter if it’s by email, phone call or video call, keep in touch with fellow employees frequently, even if it’s just a simple status update on a project.

Find a Work Space

Whether it’s at your desk, your kitchen table or your cozy bed, designate a productive, comfortable place to work in. Have everything you need within arms reach, like a computer or a notepad or a colorful assortment of pens. Is home a bit too noisy for you? Consider heading over to a local café or public library to do some work. Find the spot that works for you.

Avoid Distraction

I understand this is a tall order. Between social media and life responsibilities, it’s difficult to avoid distractions. Try to maintain focus as much as you can. Steer clear of the kitchen to avoid grazing on snacks throughout the day. Maybe invest in noise cancelling headphones or a ‘do not disturb’ sign. If possible, ask loved ones in your life to respect your work mode and give you some well deserved peace and quiet.

Take Care of Yourself

Don’t forget to take care of yourself. Have a break when needed. Walk around and strech your legs. Decompress when you are feeling stressed. If you’re feeling under the weather, don’t feel guilty about taking a sick day. Your physical and mental wellness is important, especially in times like this.


How are you all holding up during this pandemic? What’s working at home look like to you? Talk to me in the comments.

Stay safe out there, writer bees.

– Lady Jabberwocky

How to Find Your First Freelancing Gig

Hello writer bees!

When I posted about the pros and cons of freelance writing, a lot of writers reached out to me, asking for advice on where to start. Well, this post is for you up-and-coming freelancers. How does one start out as a freelancer? Where are all the gigs?

Today, we’ll talk about the secrets behind finding that first freelance job and what you need to succeed in the freelancing world.

Before The Search

Before you begin your freelancing quest, compile writing samples. You can write a mock article about a topic you are passionate about. Or you can start a blog and post regularly. OR you can use those old essays from school (wink wink). Any written example that showcases your unique tone, voice and perspective.

Take it from me, starting out was tough. It took some time until I found any writing job. You’d think a Bachelor’s Degree in English would be enough. Nope. Part of the reason I created the Lady Jabberwocky blog was to build up a writing portfolio. And it did lead me to my first couple freelance jobs.

Check out Job Boards

Look, I found my first freelance gig on Indeed. And at the time, I wasn’t even specifically looking for a freelance job. I was (desperately) looking for any writer opportunity. So check out general job sites and search key words like “writing” “blogging” or “remote” and see what you find.

However, there are job boards dedicated to freelancing. Sites like All Freelance Writing and BloggingPro share both freelance and contract jobs for writers of all skill levels. Now, I haven’t personally tried these websites, but I’ve heard of other writers using them. Just be weary of those “make cash fast writing” schemes and research companies beforehand.

The Freelance Factories

Try Fiverr or Upwork. I’ve heard mixed reviews of these sites from other freelancers. While these websites help freelancers connect to customers and opportunities, these companies do take a cut of all earnings. Keep that in mind.

I was on Fiverr for a few months. It was a platform where I offered my services and set my own rates. Did I find freelance work? Yes. Did I find recurring clients? Yes. Were my earnings equivalent to the work? I don’t think so.

Pitch Perfectly

Sometimes, you have to be brave, pitch your talents and see what happens. Pitching is all about selling yourself to potential buyers. There’s no harm in shooting your ideas out there. What’s the worse that can happen?

Is there a publication you are interest in being a part of? Check if they have a submissions page detailing their pay rates and what kind of articles they ae looking for. Consider sending them an email with your pitch idea and writing samples attached. And don’t be discouraged if you get rejected or no response. Keep at it and a door will open eventually.


For all the freelancers out there, how did you find your first gig? What kind of job was it? And what advice would you give to beginner freelancers? Share your experience in the comments.

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

How to Pitch Articles Like a Pro

Hello writer bees!

With the start of a new year, it’s time to take charge of your freelancing endeavors. How can you achieve the perfect pitch? And no, I don’t mean musically. A pitch, by definition means “words used when trying to persuade someone to buy or accept something.” Sometimes, freelancers must sell their ideas for articles to potential buyers. It’s all about that hustle.

So, let’s talk about creating an eye catching pitch. This could be for a publication you regularly write for, or, if you are gutsy, a website that you’ve never interacted with before.

Research Beforehand

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So important. Know what this potential buyer is looking for. Get a feel for their tone and their content. What kind of topics do they post about? Is the tone formal or informal? Do they include pictures and jokes? Understand their readership as well. Who is their target audience? What message do they wish to present to the world.

Here’s a pro tip; Make sure you read articles from the publication. And yes, I mean it. Actually read, don’t fib about being a “big fan” of their site. Come on, we’ve all done that.

Also, make sure you go over their submission guidelines. Just about every online publication has a guidelines page, some even show their pay per article upfront. And some editors have specific rules that they want followed, like a certain style or word count. Try to make the editor’s job easier and cover all the bases.

Know What Every Great Pitch Needs

Next, let’s break down all the essentials needed for one amazing pitch. Here’s the recipe for greatness.

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  1. What type of material?: Article? Listicle? Essay? Interview? Editors like to know the format you, as the writer, is aiming for.
  2. Potential Title: Don’t just say the topic is about “tacos”. Instead, try possible, attention grabbing headlines like “Crunchy vs Soft Shells; Which are Superior?” or “Veggie Add-ins for Taco Night.” Be aware, titles sometimes change during the editing process, don’t sweat too much!
  3. Impact: Talk about why readers would be interested in what you have to say. Give them a compelling reason why your piece fits their publication. If you know specific viewership numbers, provide a guesstimate of how many readers might read your article.
  4. Stance: If it’s an argumentative piece, discuss your perspective on the subject. Be careful of being too controversial. Always stay fact based in your opinion and cite sources when needed.

Short and Sweet

Image result for pitch idea gif

Imagine you’re in an elevator and only have a couple sentences to convey your idea. Because a great pitch only needs a few sentences to hook someone’s attention. Keep your pitch brief. Be clear and be focused. At the end of a day, a proper pitch should only be a couple hundred words, (~200-300 words).

And consider including your portfolio or publication history and a brief introduction of yourself. Don’t go overboard, we’re keeping things short, remember? But still, try to sell yourself and your talents quickly yet effectively.


Fortune favors the brave, so be brave when pitching article ideas. Best of luck with your pitches, writer bees!

To all the freelancers out there, how do you hustle in your work? What’s your advice on sending the perfect pitch?

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

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