Prompt of the Week: Spring into Spring

Describe Spring in one sentence.


Write your response in the comments below. Your entry may get a shout out next week!

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky


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April and May Post Schedule Update (Camp NaNo + MayOfMystery)

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Hello Writer Bees,

Just wanted to give you guys a quick update of what’s to come on the Lady Jabberwocky blog. Here’s the posting schedule for April and May!

April – Camp NaNoWriMo 2023

A surprise last minute entry, I will be joining Camp NaNoWriMo. Every Friday in April will be an update on my never-ending editing adventures. Will I have a finish final draft by the end of April? I hope so. But my real goal is to connect with the writing community. To cheer on and support my fellow writers. Fingers crossed; I’d also like to participate in a NaNoWriMo event. Maybe a virtual write-in. If you are interested in following my editing journey for my mystery WIP, stay tuned!

Are you participating in Camp NaNoWriMo this year? Let me know in the comments!  

May – May of Mystery

A few years ago, I started May of Mystery, a month dedicated to celebrating all things detective fiction and mystery. It’s a month where all my posts and prompts are inspired by mysteries. We tackled everything from detectives to clue hunting to whodunits and more. Recently, so many new readers have found and followed my blog. So, for all the newcomers and longtime writer bees, this May, I’m sharing some of my favorite mystery-themed posts from years past. Stories and articles that hold a special place in my slueth-loving heart. Consider this the May of Mystery: All Stars edition! Hope you enjoy!


Have any plans for your creative projects coming up? Share your progress in the comments. Let’s support one another!

Write with heart.

Love,

Lady Jabberwocky

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Five Subgenres of Science Fiction Explained

Hello Writer Bees,

Today, we’re jumping into a spaceship and exploring the subgenres of science fiction. Let’s blast off and discover some sci-fi subgenres.

Space Opera

As the name would suggest, this sci-fi subgenre takes place in outer space, without the opera singing. Plotlines center around high-risk adventure and space travel. And yes, there’s usually a sweeping romance mixed in for good measure. Space exploration is prevalent in this subgenre. Which means your characters may encounter warfare, political rebellions and exotic locations with interesting inhabitants. World building is critical in Space Opera. You not only must create one planet but an entire universe. Try keeping notes for each location close by as you write to act as a guide to your galaxy.

Dystopian & Apocalyptic

In Dystopian and Apocalyptic fiction, every day is doomsday. The world is in turmoil. Every living creature struggles. The apocalyptic story takes place in an alternative reality or timeline, after a catastrophic event or the end of the world. After the decline of the human race or the end of Earth itself, your heroes do whatever they can to survive. As a whole, this sci-fi subgenre can be looked as a metaphor. A chance to explore social and political structures, if you’re into that sort of thing. Examine the different directions humanity can take depending on their choices. What the end result of those decisions? That’s up to you. When writing a dystopian story, keep in mind the message and theme you are trying to convey. That message will act as your compass are you craft the dystopian world.

Cyber Punk 

The cyberpunk subgenre is a futuristic world centered around computer technology. This sci-fi subgenre tends to have an urban, gritty, futuristic vibe. Sometimes, cyberpunk stories have elements of dystopian fiction mixed in, making for a nuanced narrative. With overt surveillance or advanced weaponry, technology has overtaken everyone’s lives on way or another. And characters may not be 100% human. Be prepared to construct characters that aren’t all flesh and blood, that may have some machinery incorporated into their bodies. Think about how the added metal impacts their day-to-day lives.

Steampunk

Get those cogs turning with steampunk fiction. In this sci-fi subgenre, it’s all about a specific aesthetic. It’s retro and futuristic and whimsical all at once. Technological innovations are based on the shiny brass and steam powered marvels of the 19th century industrial era. Not only are the contraptions vintage inspired, so are the character’s clothing. Goggles on top hats is a look. Authors such as H.G. Wells and Mary Shelley are huge inspirations for this sci-fi subgenre. Might be a good idea to brush on that Victorian era history. Some aspects of Victorian era culture and societal norms can still be prevalent in a steampunk world.

Alternate History

Imagine if you could go back in time and change one historical event? In the Alternate History subgenre, you can. Use fiction to twist the past. In this sci-fi subgenre, a momentous event from the past occurs and is resolved differently than what happened in real life. How does the altered resolution effect the rest of the timeline? Not only that, how does this change in the timeline effect characters and society as a whole? It’s up to you as the writer to redesign history. Create what the world looks like when history has derailed from its known course. For this sci-fi subgenre, make sure you do the research beforehand. Once you have a solid understanding of history, then you can distort history with creative liberty.  


Interested in learning about other subgenres? Check out these!


What’s your favorite science fiction book? What sci-fi genre do you gravitate towards? Talk to me in the comments.

Write with heart.

Love,

Lady Jabberwocky

A Problematic Potion (100 Word Fantasy Story)

Once upon a time, there was a wizard charged with a task, to brew a potion of invisibility.

With a pixie by his side, he traveled the realm for ingredients.

A dragon scale, from a mountain’s peak. Two cups of water from the mermaid lagoon. Nectar from the lemon blossom plant. One four-leaf clover.

Once all components were complied, brewed, and sparked with magic, the potion was complete.

Pride in his chest, he sampled the final product at his workshop.

The wizard reeled back, spitting it out. The concoction tasted like sour milk. His feet turned invisible.  

The pixie laughed.


Write with heart.

Love,

Lady Jabberwocky

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What Inspired My Short Stories (Part Four)

Hey Writer Bees!

Today, I’m sharing the inspiration behind more of my short stories. From my experience, inspiration came come from anywhere. Even the littlest thing can grow into an amazing story or poem. And sometimes, fiction can say a lot about the author. Like in my case.

A Remnant of Earth

In writing and in my reading preference, Sci-Fi is not the genre I immediately reach for. However, I decided to challenge myself. So, I tried my hand in sci-fi storytelling and frankly, I wasn’t too disappointed. This story came from simply playing around in another genre. It was a good exercise to dip my toe into sci-fi. Whenever you want to challenge yourself as a writer, try writing outside your comfort zone. Create a story in a genre you don’t usually write in. It’s a way to broaden your horizon and get those creative brain working.

How Specters Visit

Fun Fact about me: One of my guilty pleasures is paranormal investigator TV shows. Which is ironic because my heart can’t handle horror movies or excessive gore. While I do believe in ghosts and adore ghost stories, I’m not sure all the ghostbusters gear they use on those shows actually work. And yet, I can’t seem to look away. When investigators discuss “spirit possession”, I wondered what that’s like for the ghost, not the person. Really, this tale was born from the question, “how would a spirit describe possessing a living person’s body?” Out came this little supernatural comedy. 

A Different Kind of Happiness

Ever scroll through social media and see posts from old friends or classmates? Photos from their picture-perfect lives and tropical vacations and their adorable children? For this story, that’s exactly what I did. Yes, I was feeling down about myself. It’s easy to feel inadequate when comparing yourself to others. But I try to keep in mind that not everything on social media is what it seems, I have my own goals that may differ from others, and that’s enough. Many of us, myself included, struggle with their mental health. That’s why I like writing stories with positive messages, to spread a little light. It’s one of the best parts of being a writer.


If you are interested in where my ideas for stories come from, be sure to check out PART ONE, PART TWO and PART THREE of this series. And if there’s a specific story that you are curious about the origins of, let me know in the comments. Maybe if there’s a part five, I will consider including it.

Is there a story behind your stories? What has inspired your creative endeavors? Talk to me in the comments.

Write with heart.

Love,

Lady Jabberwocky

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A Crash Course in In Media Res – Hook Readers Instantly with this Trick!

Hello Writer Bugs!

Today, I’m sharing with you a writing trick that will hook readers from the first sentence. Yes, you heard right. Grab the audience’s attention instantly with In Media Res. Confused by this Latin phrase? Don’t worry, I’m simplifying this narrative technique. This is the crash course in In Media Res.

Short and Sweet Advice for Writers – Start in the Middle (In ...

What is In Media Res?

Glad you asked! The term In Media Res translates to “In the midst of things.” This means a story hits the ground running and begins in the middle of a scene. Forget about lengthy exposition or flowery description. Start in the middle a conversation or an action sequence. Later on, you can drip feed readers information and backstory through flashbacks and dialogue.

Why does this trick work? Because it piques the audience’s curiosity. And that’s any writer’s goal, to catch the reader’s interest. It makes them feel like they have to catch up with the plot to learn more about the characters and their world. Think Alice chasing after the white rabbit.

No Context? No Bueno.

Yes, there is a wrong way of applying this writing technique. If you start a story too late, and don’t give any bits of context on characters and setting, the audience will be lost and confused. They wont’ keep reading if they have no idea what’s going on.

Be smart about when and where you choose to start the opening scene. You want to hook readers while giving them enough context to keep their attention. A fine line on balance on, I know. However, when you use in media res right, it can turn your story into a page turner.

Stories that Start In Media Res

Want to see this technique in action? Check out some of these attention grabbing titles.


In media res can be a powerful tool in your writer arsenal. And if done right, you’ll have your readers on the edge of their seats.

What are your favorite stories that jump right into the action? And what do you think of this writing technique? Have you used in media res before? Lemme know in the comments. As always, I’d love to hear from you guys.

Stay safe and keep writing!

— Lady Jabberwocky

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