Tag Archives: reading

My Life in Books Tag

Hello Writer Bees!

Since I recently celebrated my 300th post and 400 followers, I figured I do something lighthearted this week. And I haven’t done a tag in quite a while. So, this is my life in books.

Shoutout to TinyNavajo for doing this tag. Be sure to check out their awesome book blog!

Find A Book For Each Of Your Initials

V – Vengeance is Mine! by Mickey Spillane

A – Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

P The Postman Always Rings Twice by James M. Cain (featuring my favorite femme fatale.)

Count Your Age Along Your Bookshelf

I’m 27 years old and the 27th book on my shelf is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon. It’s on my TBR list, I heard the play was amazing.

Pick A Book Set In Your City/Country

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald. I’m from New York. I also have Lillian Boxfish takes a Walk by Kathleen Rooney and Fin & Lady by Cathleen Schine. A proud New Yorker, if you couldn’t tell. And I can’t resist a good NYC story.

Pick A Book That Represents A Destination You’d Love To Travel To

The Jewel Box by Anna Davis. I’ve always wanted to travel to London, or the U.K. in general. I’d love to visit Doyle and Christie’s old stomping grounds.

Plus, I have a few Hemingway books, like the Sun Also Rises and the short stories collection. It’s a stretch, but I’d like to take my boyfriend to Key West someday, to visit Ernest Hemingway’s home and to get him a Cuban coffee.

Pick A Book That Has Your Favorite Color On It

Surprisingly, the only lavender on my shelf is the title text color for The Mirror of Merlin by T.A. Barron. Although, I do love the blush pink on Alex & Eliza by Melissa De La Cruz.

Which Book Do You Have The Fondest Memories Of?

When I was a kid, I hated reading. Ironic, really, since I later became a writer. One day, the Scholastic book fair came to my school. While searching through the books, I found Bone (Book One): Out from Boneville. Then and there, I fell in love with graphic novels and fantasy/adventure stories.

(P.s. – Am I the only one who remembers Scholastic book fairs? Or am I just old?)

Which Book Did You Have The Most Difficulty Reading?

The Museum of Extraordinary Things. I liked the premise, but pace wise, it was a little on the slow side. I’ll probably give it another shot, though.

Which Book On Your TBR Pile Will Give You The Most Achievement When You Finish It?

This extra-thick collection of Hercule Poirot stories, written by Agatha Christie. It has over 50 short stories. Eventually, I’ll read through the entire tome of mystery.

NdydxJIUrD4C

Tag! You’re It!

Well, this was fun. If you guys decide to do this tag, let me know. I’d love to hear what’s on your bookshelves. And please click the links, it really helps support this blog.

Stay safe and keep writing, writer bees!

Love, Lady Jabberwocky

Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

Do Ronald Knox’s 1929 Rules on Detective Fiction Still Hold Up in 2020?

(With May Of Mystery right around the corner, I’ve decided to repost this article for last year. Enjoy!)

Hello my amateur sleuths!

Did you know that one famous author actually wrote rules for writing detective stories in the 1920’s?

Ronald Knox was a prominent figure in the Golden Age of Detective Fiction. As a mystery loving priest, he published the Ten Commandments on Detective Fiction. Are the rules still relevant or outdated? Let’s investigate, shall we?

1.The criminal must be someone mentioned in the early part of the story, but must not be anyone whose thoughts the reader has been allowed to follow.

True enough. If the author introduces the real killer towards the end, readers will feel cheated. How can they suspect a character that came out of nowhere? The criminal needs to be introduced within the first couple chapters of the story. Also, the audience, usually, isn’t allowed to enter the thoughts of the murderer. Their inner workings should remain unknown to the audience, until the very end.

2. All supernatural or preternatural agencies are ruled out as a matter of course.

Now, I disagree with this one, just a smidge. If done right, multiple genres can be featured in a single story. Maybe a sprinkle of supernatural could work in a murder mystery. It’s all about balance. As long as the integrity of the whodunit remains solid, other genres can join in. A little fantasy and magic never killed nobody.

3. Not more than one secret room or passage is allowable.

I mean, he has a point. A second secret passage won’t garner as much surprise as the first secret passage. One hidden room is enough. Don’t push your luck.

4. No hitherto undiscovered poisons may be used, nor any appliance which will need a long scientific explanation at the end.

Fair enough, Mr. Knox. Basically, this rule applies to all made up devices. Hard to acquire poisons from foreign lands or complex inventions are far too unlikely plotwise. Using an unusual method cheats the readers from unraveling the mystery themselves. Remember, detective fiction is meant to challenge the reader mentally, like a puzzle.

5. No Chinaman must figure in the story.

No, we’re not talking about those of Chinese descent. The term ‘Chinamen’ refers to evil mastermind character, maniacal laugh included. Antagonists need real motives. Their reason for committing a crime must be plausible. No sinister villains are welcome in a detective story.

6. No accident must ever help the detective, nor must he ever have an unaccountable intuition which proves to be right.

Frankly, this rule reminds me of those classic Scooby Doo cartoon, where clues fall into their laps. As tempting as it sounds, coincidences, chance happenings and bizarre hunches are just too easy. Every clue must be discovered on purpose, with purpose. Don’t just hand over clues on a silver platter. Make your detective, and the reader, work for every scrap of information.

7. The detective must not himself commit the crime.

Where’s the fun in that? Listen to Knox, it’d be a disaster to have the detective be the culprit. Plus, you’re killing any chance for a sequel. No pun intended.

8. The detective must not light on any clues which are not instantly produced for the inspection of the reader.

For fairness, the detective and the reader must have equal opportunity to solve the case. However, the sleuth can keep some less obvious clues to himself. Just collecting the insignificant clues in his/her pocket until the big reveal. The reader knows every hint, but just isn’t sure how important each piece of information is.

9. The stupid friend of the detective, the Watson, must not conceal any thoughts which pass through his mind; his intelligence must be slightly, but very slightly, below that of the average reader.

I object to this one. Although he wasn’t smarter than Holmes, I wouldn’t consider Watson an idiot. Seriously, Watson could pull his own weight. The sidekick can have brains too. Heck, they may even become as asset for a detective during an investigation. Instead of being slightly below the reader’s intelligence, why can’t a sidekick’s intelligence be slightly below the detective’s brainpower?

10. Twin brothers, and doubles generally, must not appear unless we have been duly prepared for them.

See, I feel like nowadays, audiences are thrilled by surprise doubles. Not all doubles or twin need a heads up in advance. (Side note: Have you guys been watching Cloak and Dagger? Talk about shocking doubles.)


Yes, all of these “commandments” have been broken in detective fiction before. However, some of these rules are still relevant by today’s standards. Murder mysteries are complicated games, whether you choose to take note of the rules or break them is up to you. You’re the writer.

What do you guys think of Knox’s rules from 1929? Do you think they still hold up to today’s whodunits? Let me know in the comments.

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

To the Teacher Made Me a Writer

In the spirit of International Women’s day, I’ve decided to take a sentimental stroll down memory lane today. Let me tell you the story of the teacher who made me a writer and changed my life.

So Back in High School….

Let me give you an mental image of the kind of kid I was in school. An average B student. Definitely not one of the cool girls. I was awkward and lanky and a total mess. And I had no idea what I would do with the rest of my life.

In Freshman year, I wrote my first fictional story and discovered I actually liked writing. English was my favorite subject. Here was the problem. In my personal life, there was no one to encourage me to pursue my talent, nor acknowledgement that I even had a talent.

Until I Met this Teacher

For now, let’s call her Miss J. She was my English teacher in both my Freshman year and my Senior year. And she saw the potential in me that I didn’t even know existed.

Miss J was a kind and lovely person. She introduced me to literature that initially inspired me to write. Works like ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’, ‘Of Mice and Men’ And Greek Mythology. The first story I ever wrote was probably in her class.

Speaking of Mythology, towards the end of Freshman year, my high school wanted to remove Greek Mythology from the curriculum and planned on throw away a bunch of books away. The horror. Before they were tossed in the garbage, she gave me one of those books. Torn and tattered, it will always remain on my bookshelf.

Struggles with Self Esteem

This one time, we were assigned to write a scene inspired by Hamlet, the play we were reading at the time. I was so excited that I worked extra hard on this two page script. Even researched authentic Shakespearean language. After I handed it in, my teacher was genuinely impressed and asked if she could read it to the whole class. I told her ‘no’.

And even today, I still regret that decision. See, my confidence was under the floorboards at the time. I was incredibly self conscious, and felt like I was rubbing my great story in everyone’s face, and then everyone would hate me. “No, no, it isn’t that great. Surely, my work isn’t the best in the class.”

Man, some days, I wish I had a time machine and could tell my younger self to not be afraid of showing my talent. That being awesome at something won’t belittle others. And honestly, I still struggle a little with that low self esteem logic today.

One of her many sweet notes.

Words of Encouragement

In my Senior year, Miss J asked us to write journal entries, which she would read. I was still nervous about others reading my writing. To break from that fear, I decided to just be funny. My journal was filled with my (embarrassing) humorous observations, kind of like what you see on the blog today. And she loved them.

So, I kept writing. She said I had a natural talent as a writer and that I had a quirky voice. Thank goodness for that quirkiness. I was amazed and humbled and happy. My silly scribbles made someone laugh. Nothing was more fulfilling. Miss J wrote me these encouraging notes, pushing me to pursue a career as a writer. I still have those notes. The most touching note from her is scrawled in my yearbook, hoping that the next time she hears my name, it’s because I’d have won the Pulitzer prize. (Insert tears here.)

Her note in my yearbook, from 2011.

To a wonderful teacher, I’d like to say thank you, from the bottom of my heart. I don’t know where I’d be right now if it wasn’t for your encouragement. You inspired me to pursue creative writing and made me the writer I am today. And you also inspired me to start this blog, where my quirkiness has room to roam and where I can encourage other writers to write their story.


[This is a repost, but an important post, nonetheless.]

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

The Secrets Behind Creating a Memorable Detective Character

Hello Writer Bees!

At the center of any great murder mystery is a great detective. Whether they are an amateur sleuth, a private inspector or a member of law enforcement, this is the character, or team, that is the heart of any whodunit. Let’s talk about the behind the scenes secrets to creating a detective character.

Be Inspired By Classic Detectives

Buster Keaton in Sherlock Junior (1924)

Before you dive right into character creation, consider the fictional detectives from classic murder mysteries. Right off the bat, we think of notable inspectors like Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot. Of course, there are many more sleuths in detective fiction, explore and read as much as you can. Diversity is crucial in this research. Once you’ve read a bunch of different mysteries, focus in on a few characters. What stands out with them? What about them catches your attention as a reader? Really think about makes those characters memorable. Be inspired by the characters and artists that came before you. Then, put your own twist on the conventional detective and be original.

What’s in a Name?

You gotta admit, some detectives out have some pretty unique names. The kind of names that turn heads, and draw people in. No, this does not mean you must frivolously choose the most ridiculous name you can think of. Be mindful about the character’s name. Feel free to play around with uncommon names. Ever heard of Harry Potter and Percy Jackson? There’s a reason those names stick in our minds.

Image result for poirot gif

If you are a loyal follower of the Lady Jabberwocky blog, you’ll know that I am currently deliberating over names for my detective. I’m considering where he is from and what sounds easy on the ears. Since he will be the main character, his name must resonate the reader in some way.

Method to the Madness

Image result for detective poirot order quote method

Next, let’s talk about method, how the detective works. Do they use brute force and bust heads to gather information? Or do they inspect for clues with a magnifying class? Or is there a special ability at work? Whatever the case, there must be a rhyme and reason to every action during their investigation. However, it’s more than just method. It’s how they navigate the world and how they interact with other people. What’s their relationship with their sidekick? How do they interrogate suspects? Really take a walk in their shoes.

The Need to Investigate

Not only should you consider how they investigate, but why they investigate. Why are they inspectors? Why does the detective solve cases? Behind every sleuth lies their motivation, the drive that compels them to unravel mysteries. Are whodunits just big puzzles for them? Or do they have a high moral values? Or are they personally connected to the crime in some way? Explore the reason why your character is in this business, or at least in a position to investigate and find the culprit.

Related image

Plus, this would be a good time to think about a catchphrase. A bit cheesy but some characters do well with a tagline. For my main character, he lives by the idea that “Life should end in a period, not a question mark.” A personal philosophy like this one can highlight one’s motive and goal, and help the reader understand the character better.

Quirks and Odd Habits

It’s those little idiosyncrasies that make a character realistic. Detectives should be eccentric, odd balls. They should have quirks and peculiar traits, like something is a little off about them. Yes, Poirot is a genius, but what makes him memorable is his need for order and precision. Does your inspector have any odd habits when in thought? If you think about it, we all have our strange quirks. For this character, dial those traits up a notch, to be extra weird and interesting. Frankly, they should be borderline alien.

Image result for columbo gif

Wrapping Up May Of Mystery

When creating a sleuth, every decision must be a conscious, specific one. Be mindful of their name, how they work, and what odd traits define them. Think of a detective as another breed of fictional character. Trust me, the world does not need more carbon copies of Holmes.

The case is officially closed. With this post, May of Mystery comes to an end. It really was a fun month, writer bees. Hope you all learned something about detective fiction. What genre themed month should I do next? Let me know in the comments. I’d love to hear your ideas.

Also, I just want to take a minute to proclaim my undying appreciation for my first patron, Mister Michael from NY. I love you to the moon and back. Check out my Patreon and help support me and this blog. Every little bit helps. Thanks everyone!

Write with heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

Do Ronald Knox’s 1929 Rules on Detective Fiction Still Hold Up in 2019?

Hello my amateur sleuths!

Today, we are breaking down the fundamentals of mystery writing. Did you know that an author actually wrote rules for writing detective stories in the 1920’s?

Ronald Knox was a prominent figure in the Golden Age of Detective Fiction. As a mystery loving priest, he published the Ten Commandments on Detective Fiction. Are the rules still relevant or outdated? Let’s investigate, shall we?

1.The criminal must be someone mentioned in the early part of the story, but must not be anyone whose thoughts the reader has been allowed to follow.

True enough. If the author introduces the real killer towards the end, readers will feel cheated. How can they suspect a character that came out of nowhere? The criminal needs to be introduced within the first couple chapters of the story. Also, the audience, usually, isn’t allowed to enter the thoughts of the murderer. Their inner workings should remain unknown to the audience, until the very end.

2. All supernatural or preternatural agencies are ruled out as a matter of course.

Now, I disagree with this one, just a smidge. If done right, multiple genres can be featured in a single story. Maybe a sprinkle of supernatural could work in a murder mystery. It’s all about balance. As long as the integrity of the whodunit remains solid, other genres can join in. A little fantasy and magic never killed nobody.

3. Not more than one secret room or passage is allowable.

I mean, he has a point. A second secret passage won’t garner as much surprise as the first secret passage. One hidden room is enough. Don’t push your luck.

4. No hitherto undiscovered poisons may be used, nor any appliance which will need a long scientific explanation at the end.

Fair enough, Mr. Knox. Basically, this rule applies to all made up devices. Hard to acquire poisons from foreign lands or complex inventions are far too unlikely and far too easy. Using an unusual method cheats the readers from unraveling the mystery themselves. Remember, detective fiction is meant to challenge the reader mentally, like a puzzle.

5. No Chinaman must figure in the story.

No, we’re not talking about those of Chinese descent. The term ‘Chinamen’ refers to evil mastermind character, maniacal laugh included. Antagonists need real motives. Their reason for committing a crime must be plausible. No sinister villains are welcome in a detective story. This is a battle wits we are talking about.

6. No accident must ever help the detective, nor must he ever have an unaccountable intuition which proves to be right.

Frankly, this rule reminds me of those classic Scooby Doo cartoon, where clues fall into their laps. As tempting as it sounds, coincidences, chance happenings and bizarre hunches are just too easy. Every clue must be discovered on purpose, with purpose. Don’t just hand over clues on a silver platter. Make your detective, and the reader, work for every scrap of information.

7. The detective must not himself commit the crime.

Where’s the fun in that? Listen to Knox, it’d be a disaster to have the detective be the culprit. Plus, you’re killing any chance for a sequel. No pun intended.

8. The detective must not light on any clues which are not instantly produced for the inspection of the reader.

For fairness, the detective and the reader must have equal opportunity to solve the case. However, the sleuth can keep some less obvious clues to himself. Just collecting the insignificant clues in his/her pocket until the big reveal, the parlor room scene. The reader knows every hint, but just isn’t sure how important each piece of information is.

9. The stupid friend of the detective, the Watson, must not conceal any thoughts which pass through his mind; his intelligence must be slightly, but very slightly, below that of the average reader.

I object to this one. Although he wasn’t smarter than Holmes, I wouldn’t consider Watson an idiot. Seriously, Watson could pull his own weight. The sidekick can have brains too. Heck, they may even become as asset for a detective during an investigation. Instead of being slightly below the reader’s intelligence, why can’t a sidekick’s intelligence be slightly below the detective’s brainpower?

10. Twin brothers, and doubles generally, must not appear unless we have been duly prepared for them.

See, I feel like nowadays, audiences are thrilled by surprise doubles. Not all doubles or twin need a heads up in advance. (Side note: Have you guys been watching Cloak and Dagger? Talk about shocking doubles.)


Yes, all of these “commandments” have been broken in detective fiction before. However, some of these rules are still relevant by today’s standards. Murder mysteries are complicated games, whether you choose to take note of the rules or break them is up to you. You’re the writer.

What do you guys think of Knox’s rules from 1929? Do you think they still hold up to today’s whodunits? Let me know in the comments.

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

To the Teacher Who Changed My Life

In the spirit of International Women’s day, I’ve decided to take a sentimental stroll down memory lane today. Let me tell you the story of the teacher who made me a writer and changed my life.

First off, I must shamelessly promote the tip jar. Check it out, just added a new reward tier on Patreon.

So Back in High School….

Let me give you an mental image of the kind of kid I was in school. An average B+ student. Definitely not one of the cool girls in school. I was shy and awkward and self conscious and a total mess. Seriously, I was. In Freshman year, I wrote my first fictional story and discovered I actually liked writing. English was my favorite subject. Here was the problem. In my personal life, there was no one to encourage me to pursue my talent, nor acknowledgement that I even had a talent. Being a teenager was hard enough, huh?

Until I Met this Teacher

For now, let’s call her Miss Judge. She was my English teacher in both my Freshman year and my Senior year. So she really saw my growth as a writer. And she saw the potential in me that I didn’t even know existed.

Miss Judge was a kind and lovely person. She introduced me to literature that initially inspired me to write. The first story I ever wrote was probably in her class. Works like ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’, ‘Of Mice and Men’ And Greek Mythology. Speaking of Mythology, towards the end of Freshman year, my high school wanted to remove Greek Mythology from the curriculum and planned on throw away a bunch of books away. The horror. That book sparked my love of fantasy and magic and everything supernatural. Before they were tossed in the garbage, she gave me one of those books. Torn and tattered, it will always remain on my bookshelf.

Struggles with Self Esteem

This one time, in class, we were assigned to write a scene inspired by Hamlet, the play we were reading at the time. I was so excited that I worked extra hard on this two page script. I even researched authentic Shakespearean language. After I handed it in, my teacher was genuinely impressed and asked if she could read it to the whole class. I told her ‘no’. And even today, I still regret that decision. See, my confidence was under the floorboards at the time. I was incredibly self conscious, and felt like I was rubbing my great story in everyone’s face, and then everyone would hate me. “No, no, it isn’t that great. Surely, my work isn’t the best in the class.” Man, some days, I wish I had a time machine and could tell my younger self to not be afraid of showing my talent. That being awesome at something won’t belittle others. And honestly, I still struggle a little with that low self esteem logic today.

One of her many sweet notes.

Words of Encouragement

I kept in touch with her through my school years. In my Senior year, Miss Judge asked us to write journal entries, which she would read. I was still nervous about others reading my writing. I mean, there’s nothing that interesting about me, right? To break from that fear, I decided to just be funny. My journal was filled with my (embarrassing) humorous observations, kind of like what you see on the blog today. And she loved them. So, I kept writing. She said I had a natural talent as a writer and that I had a quirky voice. Thank goodness for that quirkiness. I was amazed and humbled and happy. My silly scribbles made someone laugh. Nothing was more fulfilling. Miss Judge wrote me these encouraging notes, pushing me to pursue a career as a writer. I still have those notes. The most touching note from her is scrawled in my yearbook, hoping that the next time she hears my name, it’s because I’d have won the Pulitzer prize.

Her note in my yearbook, from 2011.

To a wonderful teacher, I’d like to say thank you, from the bottom of my heart. I don’t know where I’d be right now if it wasn’t for your encouragement. You inspired me to pursue creative writing and made me the writer I am today. And you also inspired me to start this blog, where my quirkiness has room to play and where I can encourage other writers to write their story.

In honor of International Women’s day, who’s a lady in your life that has made a big impact in some way? Has any teacher inspired you to pursue something? Let me know in the comments. I’d love to hear from you guys. I gotta go, I’m drowning in tears over here.

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

Tips and Tricks for Writing Setting Descriptions

Hello lovelies.

So sometimes,  writing descriptions of settings are difficult. I mean, a forest is a forest. The city is the city. While I’m not the kind of writer to prattle on about the specific color of blue, I still want a rich backdrop for my story. The world for my characters, and for the reader, should feel real.

One way I push myself to write more detailed descriptions is by asking myself questions. As silly as that sounds, trust me for a second. This actually works for me. How would I describe a scene to the reader? What do I have to do to paint that clear picture?

If you are like me, and struggle with writing about the setting for your stories, check out my list of questions below. Maybe they’ll help jog something.


Civilization

In what time does the story take place? Are we in medieval times or the roaring twenties or modern day? How can the reader tell? Provide examples of technology or clothing choices, those are usually great indicators for time and place.

Are there roads/paths to follow? Is it a dirt road or paved with cement?

What sounds are around? People chattering? Birds chirping? Absolute silence?

How’s the lighting? Is the room candle lit? Is there one buzzing electric bulb?

Is there garbage littered in the streets?  Is the room full of clutter? Or does everything look pristine?

Any smells lingering in the air? Freshly popped popcorn? What about burning wood? A posh lady’s perfume perhaps?

What is the state of a building? Is it worn down? Or newly built?

Think about the specific materials things of objects. Rough material, like burlap, versus delicate material, like silk? Think about texture.


Nature

What is the general landscape? Mountainous? Modern?

What is the temperature outside? Is it hot and balmy? Cold and chilly?

What does the terrain look like?

Are there any kinds of plants around? Trees?

Is there a water source (lake, river, pond) nearby? Or is it a lifeless wasteland?


Quick Tips

Really talk about colors. Beyond just sky blue or blood red. What does the color remind you of? Think about something really specific. I always loved the example of a “Stewed cherry dress.”

Looking up pictures on google helps sometimes, if actual visuals help jog your brain. (I got a stash of historical photos from the 1920s to look at when I have writer’s block.)

Although possibly distracting and frivolous, make sure you research, to be accurate.

Bottom line, you have to play around with the five senses. Keep those in mind when writing the fine details. Sensory details are key.


Write in the comments about what helps you create rich setting descriptions. I’d love to hear from you guys.

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

Words for Writers Wednesday: Read Everything

For you, as a writer,

to achieve great heights,

you need a solid foundation.

Every writer should read everything.

The good stuff. The bad stuff.

The classics. The new releases.

Every genre, every style, every kind of voice.

Read it all.

And once you have that solid foundation

that foundation of stories will become a launch pad

for the stories you will write.


I have this pet peeve of people who stick to only one genre. Yes, of course, you can love a specific genre or writing style. I love stories of fantasy and mystery. But there’s so much more out there. Don’t be afraid to read outside of your usual once in a while. And you never know what will inspire you.

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

 

The Writer’s Life Tag

Found this awesome tag at mylifewithbooks

Thought I’d give it a shot.

1. What do you eat or drink while writing?

This may sound weird, but dry cereal with no milk (Dairy allergy). or greasy potato chips. Yum. Roasted chickpeas are delicious too. I’m also getting into those KIND granola bars. Drink wise, I usually stick with water. Maybe a Snapple. Maybe some mango juice, to lift my spirits. Sometimes you need to eat your stress/feelings when writing.

2. What do you listen to while writing?

I’ll dance in my chair to soundtracks of Broadway shows, Newsies soundtrack specifically. Love Newsies, that music gets my energy up. I enjoy acoustic guitar and ukulele, easy breezy kind of music. I have played Jack Johnson’s “Banana Pancakes” on repeat many, many times.

3. What is your biggest writing distraction?

Somehow, I always end up with like 10-15 tabs open when I write. And I’ve definitely fallen down those YouTube rabbit holes. But yeah, too many opens tabs. Also, having a bunch of writing assignments that take me away from my personal writing.

4. What’s the worst thing that’s ever happened to you while writing?

Haven’t we all had that moment when a word doc doesn’t save? Or the battery on your laptop runs out? Or you forgot your flash drive? Yeah, I’ve had those moments. I’ve bawled and had panic attacks during those moments. Not fun.

5. What’s the best thing that ever happened to you while writing?

That wonderful burst of inspiration, when my fingers are typing fast and loud on the keyboard. Words come out in a flood. Like I caught lightning in a bottle. And for those of you that have been following this blog for awhile, you’ll know that I recently made a huge change to my plot idea that I’ve been working on. That experience of starting over has been amazing and one of the best things I have done as a writer.

6. Who do you communicate with or not communicate with while writing?

I mean, I don’t talk to anyone while I write. In the dark of the night, It’s just me at my desk. But, if I need to brainstorm, or just work out an idea out loud, I’ll talk to my boyfriend. He’s not a writer, and that can be a benefit sometimes. He sees things through a reader’s lens, not a writer’s lens and he really does help untangle my thoughts.

7. What is your secret to success and your biggest writing flaw?

I don’t know if I’d call it a secret to success. Whatever I write, I try to challenge stereotypes and cliches. I’m always pushing myself to do things differently. I just try to be honest and create 3 dimensional characters and stories that feel real.

My biggest flaw? Well, I am struggling to be consistent. I want to write fiction everyday, but sometimes it’s difficult. Missing a day of fiction writing, turns into a week of no writing very quickly. And then my motivation is low and I don’t know where to start or how to get the ball rolling. Does that make sense? Finding the time and getting motivated are my biggest flaws, and I’m working on that.

8. What inspires you? Or what makes you productive?

Whenever I read, I feel inspired. I try and learn from other writers. I consider what captures my attention and try to apply that into my own writing, so I can become a better writer. I have a tough time being productive with my writing. Being a freelance writer, I’m writing for everyone else but not for myself. I work on my story as best I can. I just know I want to write a novel one day. My dream, for the longest time, has been to have a book on a shelf with my name on it. To write the story that hooks a reader. That’s what keeps me going.

9. What is one thing you do or other writers do that’s annoying?

When writers say dumb stuff like “omg no one understands my art!” or “my story is amazing, you don’t know anything!” Seriously? I know about being protective of your work, but really, take it easy, pal.

10. Are you willing to share something you’ve written?

I have shared some of my old, junk drawer, stories on this blog before. Just some snippets of stories and scenes. I had a four part flash fiction series called The Wizard and His Lady   I’m just making use of rejected pieces and drafts from fiction class. There are a couple other short stories on my blog. One scene I posted actually has the characters from my current fiction project. They’re probably not that great, but a writer has to start somewhere, which is why I share some of my work.

((And be on the look out for a new flash fiction series on Lady Jabberwocky, coming soon!))


Hope you guys liked this tag. If there is another tag you think I should do, let me know! Have an awesome day, lovelies.

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky

Words for Writers Wednesday #2: Write What You Don’t Know

Write what you know,

So they say.

What happens when you have to write what you don’t know?

You research, and you learn, and you grow and you overcome the challenge.

So that the things you don’t know become the things you do know.

You know?


Sometimes, when you have to write about something you aren’t familiar with, there is a bit of trepidation that comes with that. Whether you are writing fiction or an essay, don’t be scared about writing a topic you are unfamiliar with. Don’t steer away from it, challenge yourself. Just remember, you are smarter than you think you are.

For me, I don’t know what it’s like to be a person from the 1920s, but I research and I try to be as accurate as possible when I’m writing fiction, even if I run into subjects that aren’t up my alley. I didn’t know much about writing about comics, but look at my job now, writing weekly comic book reviews. Never be intimidated to write about the things you are not an expert in.

Also, shout out to everyone who caught my Newsies reference.

Write with Heart,

Lady Jabberwocky