Tag Archives: WIP

NaNoWriMo 2020 (Week 4)

Hello everyone!

There’s only a few days left on National Novel Writing Month. We’re in the home stretch. Keep writing everyone, the finish line is in sight!

Sorry, this update will be short. Recently, I’ve been starting to get wrapped up with holiday preparations. I’m spending time with family and doing some Christmas shopping.

For those wondering, I had a small, relaxing thanksgiving with my family. We watched March of the Wooden Soldiers, our holiday tradition. It’s a classic Laurel and Hardy film. I cooked a dairy free meal and stayed in sweatpants all day. A lovely dinner, indeed.

Onto my NaNoWriMo progress! Unfortunately, I haven’t written much this week. What with the holidays and all. I’m still hovering around 10,000 words, halfway to my goal. Although, I haven’t made much progress word count wise, I’ve gained a new perspective on my story. There’s been some tinkering with the outline and characters.

Suspects are developing and growing more complex. New scenes and setting are being added and explored. Clues in my mystery are being more thought out and carefully placed. Despite the word count total staying the same, my WIP has grown/evolved this month. And that, I will celebrate.

Also, I’m acknowledging my weaknesses as a writer. Setting and character descriptions don’t come easily to me. It’s something I’m actively working on. I’m trying to take the time to imagine something in vivid details. Man, this Nano experience is becoming a real eye opener for me, huh?

Still, I’m inspired to keep writing even after the end of November. NaNoWriMo in December anyone?


Thanks for stopping by this blog! I appreciate all the support and positive vibes. How’s your NaNoWriMo project going? Did you reach your goals? Talk to me in the comments. I love to hear from you all.

Stay safe and keep writing

—- Lady Jabberwocky

NaNoWriMo 2020 – Week 3

Hello everyone,

We are on week three of National Novel Writing Month. How’s everyone hanging in there? Hope your projects are going well and your plans are on track.

I’m nearing the 10,000 word mark, which is halfway to my goal. I’ve been writing a little bit everyday, mostly during my lunch break at work, when I’m hiding in my cubicle. Will I reach 20,000 words by the end of the month? The pessimist in me says probably not. However, I’m writing and actually making good progress. For once, I don’t feel stuck in my WIP anymore. And that was my main goal for NaNoWriMo, to get unstuck with my story. Can you believe it? It took two slow weeks of writing to finally kick in to high gear.

Write Animated Gif

But I will admit, I fudged up a bit. Another goal for the month was to not delete anything I had written. And I did. Believe me, I had to. Those unnecessary junk words were getting in my way. It was like pulling weeds out of a garden. Still, I’m trying not to delete any more sentences, at least for the rest of November. December will be a complete slaughter of words when I start editing, I can assure you.  

Remember last week? When I told you guys I was having trouble figuring out a single clue in my murder mystery? The story needed a piece of evidence connecting a suspect to the victim. This missing puzzle piece had been bothering me for weeks. Well, I might’ve cracked the case, no pun intended. I’m in the middle of workshopping an idea for a clue that might be what I’m looking for, what my plot needs. Although, I’m not sure yet if this clue will make the final draft, I still want to test it out. NaNo is all about trying new things in writing, right?

Image result for light bulb moment gif | Funny reaction gifs,  Vulnerability, Creative process

I think opening up about my writer struggles to you guys opened up my brain to a sprig of inspiration. Good thing this blog is like the empty void I yell my writer frustrations into.  Creative endeavors are hard work. Us writer need to stick together and support one another. The writing community is absolutely amazing that way. So, thank you very much, my lovely readers, for all your kind words and support during NaNoWriMo. You really have no idea how much I appreciate your encouragement and sweetness.

For now, I’ll continue writing this murder mystery while preparing for the holidays. Sounds reasonable enough.


Talk to me in the comments. Let me know how your NaNoWriMo projects are going. And honest question, what frustrates you about writing? This empty void is big enough for everyone to yell into. As always, I love to hear from you writer bees. Best of luck to everyone participating in NaNoWriMo!

Stay safe and keep writing!

— Lady Jabberwocky

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NaNoWriMo 2020 (Week 2)

Hello everyone!

November is flying by. We’re almost at the halfway point for National Novel Writing Month. Hope everyone’s NaNoWriMo projects are going well.

Good news, I’ve been writing. Not much, but words had been added to my WIP. I’ve written a little over 5,000ish words total, which is about 25% of my NaNoWriMo goal. Actually, I’m taking my own advice and reading my old posts on building suspense in fiction. Surprised some of my writing tips are actually helpful. The inklings of new scenes have been introduced to the outline. Funny enough, I resurrected a scene from my original draft from years ago. I guess having 1,000 drafts comes in handy, now and then.

Since my WIP is set in the 1920s, I’ve hit some bumps in the road with historical accuracy this week. Which happens. Coincidently, It’s happened quite a bit this week. Three or four things I thought about incorporating into the story were not around in 1924. Bummer. Still, it keeps me on my toes, and it forces me to think outside the box. Sure, my MC can’t take his date to a “talkie”, but what else could they do for fun during the roaring 20’s? Drinks at a speakeasy, anyone?

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When writing “historical fiction”, continuity and accuracy with every little detail is critical. So, if talking films or televisions or flashlights were not created yet, it can’t be in the story. That’s why researching your setting is important. And you actually learn a tidbit of trivia along the way.

Down side to NaNoWriMo, writer’s block and self doubt returned at the beginning of this week. However, I’ve rebounded and am pushing through. I’m starting to worry I won’t reach my goal for the month. I wish I could write more words each day. I’m sure I’m not the only one feeling this way. All we have to do is keep writing. We must keep in mind that progress is progress, no matter how small.

Stay Positive Good Vibes GIF by Positively Present

Y’know, this blog is about sharing my honest experience as a writer while helping other writers. And lots of you have commented in the past about how hard writing a mystery must be. I’ve encountered this exact challenge this week. Frankly, one single clue in my murder mystery is holding up the entire operation. Snagged on a small detail. Can you believe that? Like a missing puzzle piece that’s driving me nuts.

Sometimes, a mystery story is a mystery to the author behind the mystery. Even I’m still untangling things with my outline. Mystery writing is all about balance, juggling clues and suspects is the trickiest part. How and when to present a clue to the audience is like a game. That’s why I’m using my time with NaNoWriMo to sort clues and suspects in the story.

Detective GIFs | Tenor

I’ll figure it out. I’ll keep on writing. Just cross your fingers for me, writer bees.


How’s your NaNoWriMo project going? Talk to me in the comments. I love to hear from you all.

Stay safe and keep writing

—- Lady Jabberwocky

NaNoWriMo 2020 – A Slow Start (Week One)

Hello writer bees!

Hope everyone has had a productive start to National Novel Writing Month. I’ve been following a bunch of amazing writers on Twitter, reading their excerpts and praising their impressive word counts. Seriously, some of you are incredibly talented and really crushing November. Hats off to you folks. You are doing great!

Unfortunately, I’ve had a slow beginning to NaNoWriMo.

Of course I got super sick the first weekend of November. Of course I did. While everyone else got a jumpstart on writing, I was curled up with cramps all weekend. And then, when I started to feel better, the election happened. (And kept happening.)

I don’t know about you all, but I’ve been a bundle of stress and anxiety for the past couple days. Between NaNo and this seemingly never-ending election alone, my brain is fried.

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However, I’m trying to make up for lost time. Writing during lunch breaks at work and after hours. I’ve added a few thousand to my overall wordcount. Maybe about 3,000 words this week? Not a big leap, but hey, progress is progress. Sticking with my untraditional goals, nothing has been deleted, no matter how badly I want to. Plus, that twinkle of motivation is returning to my work, which is what NaNoWriMo is all about, right?

Yes, It’s been a slow start for me. I have not given up yet. Slowly but surely, this WIP will get finished. Eventually. Shout out to my lovely boyfriend for being supportive and providing snacks during this crazy time. I plan to spend this weekend doing some writing sprints, boost my word count up and workshop some new ideas for scenes. That’s the hope anyway. Cross your fingers for me.

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To all those participating in National Novel Writing Month, best of luck in your writing endeavors. No matter how many words you write, celebrate every victory.

How is your NaNoWriMo journey going? What is your project? What are your goals for the month? And seriously, how are you feeling, you know, emotionally? Talk to me in the comments. I love to hear from you.

Safe safe and keep writing, writer bees!

— Lady Jabberwocky

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Buy me a cup of tea during NaNoWriMo?

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NaNoWriMo 20 Questions Tag (2020 Edition)

Hello Writer Bees!

National Novel Writing Month is just days away! I am both wildly excited and incredibly unprepared. Recently, I was asked to do the NaNoWriMo tag by a longtime follower of this blog. Jai Lyn is this lovely writer and blogger who is always leaving me the sweetest comments. I literally dropped everything to do this tag for her and for you guys!

The rules are simple….

  1. Thank the awesome blogger who tagged you!
  2. Link back to the creator of this tag, Sophie @ Sophie’s Corner.
  3. Feel free to use the NaNoWriMo 20 Questions Tag graphics!
  4. Answer the questions.
  5. Tag some friends who are also doing NaNo this year.
  6. And have fun!!!

Thank you to the fabulous Sophie @ Sophie’s Corner for creating this tag. And thanks so much to Jai Lyn for tagging me to participate this year!

Let’s get started, shall we?

Tell me about your NaNoWriMo project this year! Give me a blurb!

The title is ‘The Case of the Drowned Mermaid’.

Coney Island, New York, 1924. When a sideshow mermaid is found drowned in her tank, can private detective G.W. Barnaby and his associate, Oscar Fitzgerald, find her killer? Or will this case be another unsolved murder?

What’s the genre?

It’s a mystery! No, really, my WIP is in the mystery/detective fiction genre. Hopefully, one day, it will become a proper whodunit. While there is a bit of romance and drama thrown in, The Case of the Drowned Mermaid is a good ol’ murder mystery.  

Describe your MC in three words.

Oscar Fitzgerald, my narrator and dapper, young man of the 1920s, is charming, sarcastic and impatient. 

Without spoilers, describe your villain in three words.

Perfectionist. Doting. Manipulative.  

What is your goal? (the traditional 50K? 20K? 5K? or……. 100K?)

I’m aiming for 20,000(ish) words this November. Really, any amount of words will do. My real goal is to break free of writer’s block. If you want to read more about my untraditional NaNo goals, check out my last post.  

Is this your first draft? Second? Third?

Feels like more drafts than I can count. This could be the third or fourth draft. Hard to say. I’ve been working on this project for about 3 years, and it has gone through many evolutions. 

Are you starting a new project (or draft), or continuing an existing one?

Nope, I’m continuing an existing WIP. It’s already about 30,000 words in length. I’m hoping to add to that this November. 

What is your favourite time to write in the day?

I’m a night owl, writing at night is my favorite time to write. Do I get enough sleep? Absolutely not. But I can’t help if I only get inspired around midnight.

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Where are you going to write?

Probably at home. And probably a bit of sneaky writing at my cubicle. 

Computer or paper?

The majority of my notes are scribbled onto various sticky notes and notebook paper. When it comes to writing the story, I will be typing my WIP on the computer. I admire those who are handwriting their work. I tip my hat to you.

NaNoWriMo is a huge commitment!! How are you going to make time to write?

I honestly have no idea. I’m gonna try my best to make time. Use every free moment to work on this project. Cross your fingers for me.  

Are you going to participate in local or online NaNoWriMo events? (e.g. kick-off parties in your city, write-ins, virtual writing sprints…)

Unfortunately, write-ins are most likely cancelled due to covid. I’m not sure if I’ll participate in a virtual writing event. Don’t think I will, but I am available to be anyone’s buddy on the NaNoWriMo website. 

Do you write from beginning to end or skip around?

Oh, I’ve been skipping around this story for a long time. I always try to juggle too many things at once. That has been a struggle for me in the past. I’m learning how to work on one scene at a time.  

Planner or pantser? (or plantser?)

Little bit of both, so I guess that makes me a plantser. I have a vague outline I’m trying to stick to while giving myself wiggle room to be creative and wander off the path, if I need to. Best of both worlds, right?

What will be your go-to NaNoWriMo snack?

I LOVE snacking while writing. Potato chips, roasted chickpeas, salsa and tortilla chips, dry cereal, popcorn. Basically, any crunchy or salty treat. I won’t say no to a fat slice on banana bread though.

(Can you tell this is my favorite question?) 

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Choice of caffeine? (or no caffeine?)

Not much of a caffeine drinker. I know, shocking. A decaf tea is fine for me.

Any rewards for milestone achievements? For finishing NaNoWriMo?

If I reach my goal of 20k, or any significant word count goal, I plan to spoil myself with NaNoWriMo swag. I’ve never set up rewards for myself. I want to this year. Plus, I’ve always wanted a cool NaNo sweater or mug while also supporting this amazing charity.

Share a tip for other NaNo-ers!

With word count goals, don’t be too hard on yourself. NaNoWriMo is meant to motivate writers to write and to encourage creativity. Any amount you write, whether it’s 5 words or 50,000 words, is progress. Celebrate progress.

How are you feeling about NaNoWriMo? (Excited?! Nervous!? Terrified?!)

All of the above. Lately, I’ve been feeling so stuck with my WIP, I’m afraid I’ll still be stuck during NaNoWriMo. On the other hand, I’m determined to work on my WIP and excited to share my experience and connect with other writers.

Share an aesthetic for your NaNoWriMo novel!

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Hope you all enjoyed my answers for this tag. I tag any other NaNoWriMo participants who want to share their project. Shout out again to Jai Lyn. Please go check out their blog, there’s some wonderful content to be found.

To all those attempting NaNoWriMo this year, I wish you the best of luck. Let me know in the comments what you are working on for November. As always, I love to hear for you writer bees.

Stay safe and keep writing!

— Lady Jabberwocky

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How to Choose a Read Worthy Book Title

Hello writer bees!

If there’s any silver lining to this chaotic time, it’s that writers are using their time to work on new projects. And with new projects comes a daunting task; Choosing the perfect title. It’s a huge question for any writer with a WIP. How do you create an interesting title that catches the readers attention and perfectly represents your story?

Today, I’m showing you what story elements can lead you to a read worthy title. Here are some ideas for where you can find the name of your book.

Character Inspired Titles

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If you have a character focused piece, pick a title that highlights the main character. Although it might be a simplistic option, a book named after a protagonist can be compelling to potential readers. And it doesn’t necessarily need to be the character’s name either. Think about the role the character plays in their world.

Examples

Setting Themed Titles

Consider naming the book after a prominent location featured in the story. Do the characters live in a specific town or residence? Or are they traveling to a certain destination? Settings transport the audience to a different time and place. Intrigue your readers with an invitation to a new world.

Examples

Memorable Line or Object

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Is the adventure centered around a coveted object? Or is there a sentence/phrase that sums up the entire novel? A memorable line or item featured in the story can become a great book title. Search through the text and find those stand out bits that you feel represent the entire novel well.

Examples

Bonus Tips for Book Titles

  • Represent the right genre: If you pick a title that sounds like a fantasy story but it’s really a murder mystery, reader will be confused. Choose a title that reflects the genre. Research book titles in your preferred genre before naming.
  • Understand the theme: What themes does the novel explore? Underlying themes can be transformed into thematic phrases. Theme inspired titles give a nod to the audience of what the story is about. (ex. Pride and Prejudice)
  • Look through bookshelf: Check out your bookshelf, or the shelves at a library or bookstore. As a reader, what kind of titles catch your attention? Novels from other writers may inspire a title for your own piece.

Bottom Line

When coming up with a book title, focus on the core elements of the story. A character, a setting or even a memorable line can become a read worthy title.

What is the title of your WIP/Novel and how did you choose it? What are some of your favorite book titles? Lemme know in the comments.

Stay safe and keep writing!

Lady Jabberwocky

Writing Services // Follow Me on Twitter

Skeleton in the Closet (Mystery Short Story)

“You sure you’re sure about this one, boss? She just a sweet old lady.”

His wrinkled face pinched into a scowl as he glared at the muggy March sky. “Dreadful weather today.” He grumbled, fastening his coat. Cold and rainy, my mother would call this ‘soup weather’. Clutching the handle of his cane, he teetered down the pathway of the Madam’s estate.

Keeping with his turtle slow pace, I held an umbrella over both of our heads. “Are you even listening?”

“Of course.” Mister Barnaby assured me. I had worked with him long enough to know he was certainly not listening.

It was an awfully big house, far too ritzy for my taste. May as well live at the Plaza. Upon entering the sprawling mansion, a church mouse dressed as a maid met us at the door. Glancing behind her, she presented us with a simple key, the last piece of the puzzle. As we were led into the living room, I stuffed the skeleton key into my vest pocket.

“Detective Barnaby, come in. Come in!” A gracious greeting offered by the lady of the house. Mrs. Matilda Pierce, a well kept woman, with pristine makeup and not a hair out of place. Trust me, this broad didn’t look a day over 50. Perched by the fireplace, she sat in her antique rocking chair, wearing a dressing gown embroidered with orchids.

“Fiona, dear,” Mrs. Pierce beckoned for her timid maid. “Bring some more tea for the detective and his assistant.” The maid scurried off. After sipping her cup of tea, her lips curled “Did you find him?”

Three months Franklin Pierce had been missing. His shiny automobile still parked in the driveway. Most of his personal possessions were still in the home. And none of the staff members saw him leave either. An odd case, wouldn’t you say?

Tipping his tweed cap like a proper English gentleman, Mister Barnaby eased into the chair opposite her. “Unfortunately, your husband is still missing. We are still investigating. Your granddaughter is quite concerned, last we spoke to her.”

Her hand waved dismissingly. “Oh she worries too much. Franklin probably went on another fishing trip.”

“One of your maids said that you were arguing with you husband before his disappearance.”

“Couples have disagreements. Couples take breaks,” She patted my cheek like a long lost grandmother. “You’re young, sweetie. You will learn soon enough.”

“I see.” Mister Barnaby gave me a measured nod, a signal that meant ‘fetch, dog, fetch’. Oh, the joys of being a detective’s right hand man. I excused myself to go to the restroom, leaving my employer and the madam alone by the fire.


Last night, the detective lectured me on old homes with their various hiding places. How he suspected Mr. Pierce was still on the property, one way or another. How the maid promised to give us the skeleton key when we arrived tomorrow.

“Check behind every door, every closet.” Mister Barnaby instructed. “Mr. Pierce is still in that house.”


I searched anything that had a hinge. Cupboards with hidden compartments. Closets within closets. What kind of maniac built this house? Then, I checked a closet in one of the guestrooms. Behind fur coats and cardboard boxes of leftover Christmas decorations was a narrow wooden door. A secret passage, if you will. The door led to stairs, and the stairs led to a basement.

I found Franklin Pierce. Strangled to death and left to rot in a cement room under his home. A kiss of red lipstick stamped on his cheek. Early stages of decomposing. Poor fella had seen better days. When I returned to the detective’s side, Mrs. Pierce was reapplying her red lipstick in the mirror. And she began to laugh. “Oscar, darling, you look like you’ve seen a ghost.”

“More like a skeleton in a closet, boss.” I muttered to Mister Barnaby, lighting a ciggy in my mouth. The mad madam continued to laugh.


To end May of Mystery, here’s a story based on a prompt of the week, featuring characters from my WIP, Detective Barnaby and his assistant Oscar. Enjoy!

– Lady Jabberwocky

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Things to Do Before ____: The Bucket List Tag

Hello writer bees.

It’s been a long week. And if I’m honest, I’ve feeling a little drained. It seems like everyone is struggling during this pandemic, both emotionally and health wise. Really reminds you how short life is, huh?

One of my goals for 2020 is to be more positive. I’m not a motivational speaker. I’m just a writer trying to keep her head above water. And the last time I was about to fall down the rabbit hole of deep depression, I started writing a list of things I hope to do in my life. It’s a note on my phone, titled ‘things to do before ____’. Before what? Before I turned 30? Before I die? It never felt right for me to fill in the blank, not sure why. Regardless, this ever growing list keeps my spirit up when I need it.

Then I stumbled on the Bucket List tag, where you write 10 things you want to do in your life. And now, here we are. This is my bucket list.

  • Write and publish a novel.
  • Get a bunch of tiny tattoos.
  • Go to Disney World and possibly Disneybound.
  • See a Ballet.
  • Mentor young writers.
  • Adopt a rescue dog or cat.
  • Travel to Baltimore.
  • Learn to cook healthy.
  • Visit a NYC Speakeasy.
  • Find a Blog Sponsor for Lady Jabberwocky. (wink wink)

Probably no one will be interested in this post, and that’s fine. But maybe, someone out there will start their own list and feel a little uplifted. I think we all need a pick me up right about now.

Share your bucket list on your own blog/social media or leave it in the comments here.

Stay well and stay safe, everyone.

– Lady Jabberwocky

The Top 5 Tips for Working at Home

Hello writer bees!

While it seems the entire world on lockdown, many folks have are now working from home. As a freelance writer, I was already remote working before it became the norm. Whether you are under quarantine or just don’t feel like trudging to the office, check out these helpful tips for working at home.

Create a Routine

Establish a schedule and work hours, like you would at your regular job. Some people just pretend they are in the office; That’s definitely one trick you can try. At the start of your day, plan out what needs to be done and what deadlines need to be met. Take off your pjs and bunny slippers and actually get dressed for success. It will ease you out of that “lazy day” headspace. And be sure to factor in break time too. Try to repeat the same routine each day and make working from home a habit.

Overcommunicate With Co-Workers

Communication is key in any field. With remote working, you and your co-workers should always be on the same page. There are plenty of chat room and virtual meeting applications to choose from, think about using one of them to connect with your team. No matter if it’s by email, phone call or video call, keep in touch with fellow employees frequently, even if it’s just a simple status update on a project.

Find a Work Space

Whether it’s at your desk, your kitchen table or your cozy bed, designate a productive, comfortable place to work in. Have everything you need within arms reach, like a computer or a notepad or a colorful assortment of pens. Is home a bit too noisy for you? Consider heading over to a local café or public library to do some work. Find the spot that works for you.

Avoid Distraction

I understand this is a tall order. Between social media and life responsibilities, it’s difficult to avoid distractions. Try to maintain focus as much as you can. Steer clear of the kitchen to avoid grazing on snacks throughout the day. Maybe invest in noise cancelling headphones or a ‘do not disturb’ sign. If possible, ask loved ones in your life to respect your work mode and give you some well deserved peace and quiet.

Take Care of Yourself

Don’t forget to take care of yourself. Have a break when needed. Walk around and strech your legs. Decompress when you are feeling stressed. If you’re feeling under the weather, don’t feel guilty about taking a sick day. Your physical and mental wellness is important, especially in times like this.


How are you all holding up during this pandemic? What’s working at home look like to you? Talk to me in the comments.

Stay safe out there, writer bees.

– Lady Jabberwocky

Pen Name VS. Real Name: The Great Writer Debate

Hello writer bees!

So, lately, I’ve noticed a heated debate within the writing community. When you finally publish a story, should you use your real name or a pen name? For aspiring authors, it’s a tough question. Have no fear, I’m here to help!

Today, I’m taking a look at the pros and cons of both sides of the argument, to help you decide what name will be printed on your book cover.

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Pros of a Pen Name

  • The power on anonymity: Some people find freedom in using a new moniker. And If you are sharing a personal life story, you can keep it private. Your boss and your church friends won’t have any idea.
  • Choose a more ‘writerly’ name: Create a memorable, eye catching name that suits the genre you are writing in. Pen names give you a chance to give yourself the name you’ve always wanted.
  • Dip your toe in multiple genres. Be fluid and experiment in various genres with multiple personas. And if you fail to sell enough books, simply reinvent yourself.

Cons of a Pen Name

  • Difficult Marketing: It’s harder to spread the word on your book under a nom de plume. Keeping your true identity a secret may hurt your book promoting process.
  • Struggle with building an author-reader connection. And it takes some time for the name to gain recognition.
  • Establishing a brand new persona. With a pen name, you may have to balance a double life. That might mean managing multiple social media accounts and writer websites etc.

Authors That Used Pen Names

  • J.K. Rowling (Joanne Rowling)
  • Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)
  • Lewis Carrol (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson)
  • Dr. Seuss (Theodore Seuss Geisel)
  • Stan Lee ( Stanley Martin Lieber)

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Pros of Using Your Real Name

  • Pride: That’s your name on the cover of the book. Sweet success belongs to you. Some writers dream about seeing their name in a bookstore. It’s a major accomplishment.
  • Easier to promote your work with your real name. Friends, family members, neighbors etc. will know it’s you. And you can do more local promos as well.
  • One name, one identity. No need to manage multiple social media accounts or author websites. Also, forget the hassle or confusion of a fake moniker. Readers and business associates know how to address you.

Cons of Using Your Real Name

  • Your name may sound similar to another famous name. That might cause confusion to readers.
  • You may have a forgettable or fairly common name. (Shout out to the John Smiths of the world.)
  • You are writing within a genre where books written by the opposite gender sell better. Unfortunately, sexism against authors is real.

Would you use a pen name or your real name when you publish a book? And what’s your take on nom de plumes? Talk to me in the comments!

Write with heart,

Lady Jabberwocky