What Inspired My Short Stories (Part Three)

Hey Writer Bees!

You guys seem to really like when I talk about the inspiration behind some of my stories. And I love hearing what inspires all of you in your creative works. So today, I’m coming at you with part three.

If you are curious, be sure to check out PART ONE and PART TWO of this series.

Scrunchies and School Bells

When I wrote this short story, many were heading back to school. I’m a 90’s kid who loves nostalgia and at the time, I was watching the Saban Moon documentary. I found myself in the mood to write something lighthearted and silly, packed with nostalgic reverences. And maybe a bit of cringey, relatable vibes too. Because let’s face it, we were all losers in school. Creating a character who was unapologetically themselves was refreshing. Also, it was good practice for me as writer to focus on describing a character’s appearance. How a character presents themselves says a lot about them. In short, wacky 90s vibes inspired this short story.

Pixies and Paperwork

Don’t get me wrong, I’m grateful for my current cubicle job. It’s helping my partner and I save up for future plans, and I write during breaks. However, there are days when work is stressful and soul sucking. I’m sure a lot of other people out there feel the same way, no matter their career. When I wrote this piece, I was feeling down. And like I did with Sunny Day Towing Company story, I wrote out those gloomy feelings. I wanted to cheer up not only myself, but others who may feel the same as I do. To bring a little light and a little positivity into someone’s day.

The Cinnamon Witch

By far, one of my favorite short stories I’ve ever posted on the blog. And just in time for spooky season too! For me, I enjoy writing in low fantasy worlds. Stories like Gravity Falls and Kiki’s Delivery Service have always appealed to me. Taking a single detail of a story and twisting it around is super fun and keeps readers on their toes, that’s for sure. Experimenting in a genre I don’t normally write in, like horror, is good for the creative muscles. For example, in this piece, I considered what if those ingredients aren’t exactly sugary sweet and come from a horrifying source? From that question came came this short story.


Is there a story behind your stories? What has inspired your creative endeavors? Talk to me in the comments.

Write with heart.

Love,

Lady Jabberwocky

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The Secret Behind Writing Meaningful Character Deaths

Hello Writer Bees!

Hope you all are doing well and staying creative.

With spooky season right around the corner, and with that recent episode of critical role, I’ve been thinking about character deaths lately. Morbid, I know. But realistically, not every character makes it to the end of the story alive. So today, let’s talk about the key to writing meaningful death scene.

For the Story

In fiction, death must serve a purpose, whether to the overall plot or to the characters themselves.

A single character’s death could be used as a major catalyst in the events of a story and the lives of other characters. In terms of the narrative, character death can raise the stakes. It’s a wakeup call to both the cast and the audience that lives are at stake. That not every character may survive in the end. By raising the stake in this way, the underlying tension and suspense will grow, and readers will be hanging on the edge of their seats.

Apart from building suspense, a character’s death can also add to the atmosphere and exposition. A death scene can set the mood for the story, in practically any genre. Remember the writing rule, ‘Show, Don’t Tell‘, and save yourself from writing an info-dump. If the fictional world is plagued with war or a virus, then bodies hitting the ground is an effective, and incredibly terrifying, image. Use a character’s death as a tool for creating the mood of a setting.

For the Characters

For other characters specifically, another character’s death can change how they go forward in their lives. Characters should be written like real life people. Death often comes will a strong emotional response.. When someone dies, it can change one’s outlook or view on their world, other people or ever themselves. For better or for worse. It can alter the course of their future actions.

However, be careful using this as a plot device as it can lean towards cliché. Often times, killing one to motivate another can feel like an overused or stale occurrence. Think about it. How many movies involve the main character’s love interest dying and as a result, the hero rises and is motivated to avenge their lover? And unfortunately, because of this, women are sometimes written off as expendable and not as fully developed characters. Big no-no, writer bees.

Final Thoughts

Next time you think about killing your darlings, take a minute and consider this. What purpose does this character’s death serve? How with this impact the story and other characters? Really considering the why can be a game changer in your writing.


How do you go about writing a character’s death scene? What character in fiction crushed you when they died? Talk to me in the comments!

Write with heart.

Love,

Lady Jabberwocky.

How to Conquer Your Writer’s Doubt

Hello Writer Bees,

I had a completely different idea for this week’s post.

But I kept thinking about a writer buddy of mine, Jai Lynn. She’s this wonderful poet/writer and we often exchange positive writing vibes and love to one another. Couple weeks ago, she vented about feeling stressed and overwhelmed about her writing. And I know a lot of other writers, myself included, are in the same boat.

If you’ve struggled with self-doubt, anxiety and stress from being a writer, keep these three things in mind.

Be Okay Writing Trash

Most of us strive for perfection. To write the most perfect sentence in the most perfect plot. Unfortunately, perfection is impossible. Even if you think it’s garbage, just try to get the words on paper. The first drafts of a story aren’t meant to look pretty. That’s what editing and revisions are for. Every story starts somewhere, so accept the fact that you may write trash before you create an exceptional story.

Take a Break

Your mental health is important. If writing feels like a daunting task, take some time off. Focus on other things. Relax and recharge and eat some potato chips. Yes, it may seem counterproductive and that might make you feel a little anxious. And that’s alright. Make sure you take care of yourself. And trust that inspiration, ideas, and those good creative juices will return.

You Are Not Alone

Think about your favorite author. They too have probably struggled with writer’s doubt, felt uninspired or not good enough. Everyone faces those dark moments. But writers keep writing until they find the light at the end of the tunnel, until the story is told. So, if you’re experiencing writer hardships, remember, you are not alone. There is a whole community of other writers and creatives facing the same struggles. We need to support one another in our creative endeavors.


How do you get through writer’s doubt and stress? What’s your advice to struggling writers. Talk to me in the comments. As always, I love to hear from you guys. Also, please send the lovely Jai Lynn some positive writing vibes. Us writers need to stick together.

Write with heart.

Love,

Lady Jabberwocky